the irresistible fleet of bicycles


Leave a comment

NYT examines GMOs

nolancalisch

Photo by Nolan Calisch

After a thorough examination, the New York Times has concluded that the basic problem with GMOs is not the one you probably think of first (that they are possibly unsafe to eat), but rather that they have not provably led to increased crop yields or reduced pesticide use.

An analysis by The Times using United Nations data showed that the United States and Canada have gained no discernible advantage in yields — food per acre — when measured against Western Europe, a region with comparably modernized agricultural producers like France and Germany. Also, a recent National Academy of Sciences report found that “there was little evidence” that the introduction of genetically modified crops in the United States had led to yield gains beyond those seen in conventional crops.

Read the full article HERE.

Doubts About the Promised Bounty of Genetically Modified Crops
Danny Hakim, October 29, 2016, New York Times


Leave a comment

ocean forager amanda swimmer live on GH radio this tuesday

Amanda Swimmer wild-harvests local seaweed in her home in British Columbia to sell for food and medicine. She talks to Greenhorns Radio about local foods, added value products, and the value of our ocean commons on the Heritage Radio Network this TUESDAY DEC 6 at 4:00 p.m.


Leave a comment

we are all deplorables

img_0555

Journalist Chris Hedges weighs in on the “downward spiral of hating those who hate you,” which seems especially relevant given the current political climate. Read an excerpt from his article here, and find a link to the full article on NationofChange below.

The self-righteousness of the liberal class, which revels in imagined tolerance and enlightenment while condemning the white underclass as irredeemable, widens the divide between white low-wage workers and urban elites. Liberals have no right to pass judgment on these so-called deplorables without acknowledging their pain. They must listen to their stories, which the corporate media shut out. They must offer solutions that provide the possibility of economic stability and self-respect.

We are all deplorables
Chris Hedges, November 22, 2016, NationofChange
Read the full article HERE.

bellegarde


Leave a comment

Bellegarde Bakery

The best way to restore justice and foster equality is to remediate the land. Respect for ourselves derives from respect for nature, first and last. If we do not respect the system of life, we will have no moral ecology. Nature is a church and its rhythm a prayer. The democracy of food, that most basic human right, is the stewardship of our humanity. If we do not regain control of our food’s narrative—its quality, origin, price, preparation—we will become victims instead of protagonists. If we do not make affordable access to fresh, healthy, organic food the premise of our new system—if it remains distant, contrived, boutique—we will duplicate the systems of oppression we seek to usurp.

Graison Gill will be on Greenhorns Radio, Heritage Radio Network tomorrow 4pm EST – listen in! And for more information on Bellegarde and their process, check out this video.


Leave a comment

seeds go sailing, wonderful european sail freight in motion

screen-shot-2016-11-25-at-2-01-05-pmSeed Journey — a project from the artist group Future Farmers— is a seafaring voyage connected to a public art project. “Seed Journey moves people, ideas and seeds through time and space. This voyage—its crew and cargo—are agents that link the commons as they relate to local networks and a more global complex of seed savers and stewards of the land, air and water. A rotating crew of artists, anthropologists, biologists, bakers, activists, sailors and farmers join the journey and share their findings at host institutions along the route from small harbors to large ports from barns to museums (contemporary art, natrual history and maritime) to social centers.”


Leave a comment

what thanksgiving looks like at standing rock

17kitchen-8-master675

Photo cred to Deborah Kates of the NYT

Ever late to the party, The New York Times is finally giving Standing Rock some much-deserved coverage. This gorgeous and inspiring video (and its accompanying article) gives sober context to Thanksgiving celebrations all over this country last week.

Caitlyn Huss, 25, a manager of a vegan hostel in Los Angeles, was closing up late one night last month when the tent flap opened and someone dropped off a deer that had just been killed by a car.

“We knew we had to find an elder from the sacred fire to come and bless it, then find someone who could skin it for us,” she recalled. “It was crazy.”

Not incidentally, Severine and Krista spent the afternoon making saurkraut to send to Standing Rock. And foraged apples from a 150 year old tree..
The events that are transpiring in North Dakota, though horrific, are providing a context for new agrarians, Native Americans, veterans, peace activists, climate activists and people from all across the country to unify in a land occupation that is about protecting the commons. We are moved and we are hopeful.
mongolia-land-art


Leave a comment

LAND ART IN MONGOLIA

mongolia-land-art

LAM 360° (Land Art Mongolia | acronym LAM) is a biennial art festival located in Mongolia. LAM focuses on Land Art as a form of spatial visualization of the relations between nature, culture and social policies. It strongly promotes freedom of expression in joining people and institutions from all sectors of Mongolian society by meshing their respective backgrounds and perspectives through collaboration and networking actions of regional and global scope.

This past festival took place in Southeast Gobi and was called Catching the Axis –in between the sky and the earth. Check out the website to be inspired about ways to make informative and moving LAND ART.