the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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ny: hester street fair

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This Spring, we have taken the extra time to solidify exciting collaborative relationships, ensure a full calendar of events, revamp our website (freshest version coming soon), and focus on press outreach, marketing, etc. We look forward to a strong opening day, May 14th! The season will run through October 29 with Saturday markets 11-6 and Sunday special events. Hope to see you there!

We are calling all good vibes and ideas! This season will be activated with skills workshops, collaborative activities, and of course diverse high quality vendors of goods spanning design, art, food, found, fashion & more.  

We are currently accepting and reviewing all 2016 applications. If you have already applied, thank you and you’ll hear from us very soon. If not, we’d love to hear from you.

Please review all of the online information and be sure to include your preferred vending dates along with your product descriptions as soon as possible. If accepted, you will be contacted with additional instructions on how to complete your reservations.

Please note: this season, Hester Street Fair will also be offering Full Season and Half Season packages.

Submit your application today.


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new farm floats into the big apple

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New York’s Newest Urban Farm Will Float Down The Hudson River

New York City’s newest urban farm will look a little different from most: instead of factory-like rows of plants growing in a warehouse, it will be a lush, natural-looking food forest that floats down the Hudson River in a barge.

As it docks at local piers this summer—stopping at each pier for at least two weeks—New Yorkers will be able to get on, wander around, and pick free food.

The farm-as-art-project, called Swale, is on the water for a few reasons. The first is practical. Food forests are a type of community garden that mimics a natural landscape, and that anyone can freely harvest. Though they exist in a few other places, such as Seattle, they’re illegal on land in New York City. But by putting Swale in the Hudson River, the artists who created it were able to sidestep that regulation.

Read the full article HERE!


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ny: wassail and balkan dance party

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Happy Spring! We are please to invite you to our 20th Annual Wassail. This year we will be joined by an unusually robust group of musicians. There will be wassailing, singing, dancing and feasting among the trees. As always, we invite anyone who would like to camp in the orchard, (which is now certified organic!), to do so. Please note the Wassail is being held at Breezy Hill Orchard-just outside Rhinebeck. There is a lot to celebrate this year, especially our purchase of Stone Ridge Orchard. We will be unveiling some exciting new plans for that farm at the Wassail.

RSVPs are quite important to us to make sure we are cooking the right amount of wonderful foods for you all. The wood fired pizza oven will be cranking, the cider will be pouring. We will have wonderful new hard cider releases which you will be the first to taste. Please help us publicize this event by sharing this email with family, friends and colleagues.   flexible pricing, no one turned away


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long table harvest (a food rescue organization) needs your help!

Long Table Harvest gleans surplus produce from farms in Columbia County and distribute it to those in need. About 1/4 of the population in Columbia County is food insecure and/or low-income. We are working with 14 distribution sites in the county, half are pantries and the other half are non-profits and community organizations already working with community members who would benefit from better access to fresh produce.
They are in the middle of a fundraising campaign via IndieGoGo. If you have a moment, please take a look our campaign and share it with your customers, CSA members, press outlets or anyone you think may want to know about what we are doing. This project is very much a community effort! You can also donate — every dollar counts.


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kale, racial justice, and reclaiming our collective right to the earth

 

A beautiful walk around Soul Fire Farm with the thoughtful, insightful, and fiercely passionate Leah Penniman. This film was produced by The Next System Project and the Laura Flanders Show, as part of their series on gender, race, and the next system.

I’d write more about the farm, but my paraphrasing would never be as powerful as their own words: “Soul Fire Farm is committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. We raise life-giving food and act in solidarity with people marginalized by food apartheid. With deep reverence for the land and wisdom of our ancestors, we work to reclaim our collective right to belong to the earth and to have agency in the food system. We bring diverse communities together on this healing land to share skills on sustainable agriculture, natural building, spiritual activism, health and environmental justice. We are training the next generation of activist-farmers and strengthening the movements for food sovereignty and community self-determination.”


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silvopasture practices and perspectives in the northeastern us

The use of silvopasture systems on farms in the Northeastern United States has never been documented. Our objective was to gather baseline data to describe silvopasture practices and perspectives in the Northeastern United States. To accomplish this, we investigated the structure, management of, and reasons for use of silvopastures in New York state and New England through a series of interviews and inventories on 20 farms purposefully chosen as practicing silvopasture. Thematic content analysis was conducted to summarize interview results and identify trends related to silvopasture practices. Three farmers in this study had been practicing silvopasture on their farms over 30 years; the rest were new to silvopasture in the past 10 years. Only three of 20 farmers interviewed in this study had experience practicing silvopasture prior to implementing it on their farms. Forest conversion to silvopasture was the primary starting point for silvopastures observed on regional farms. Orchard, open field edge, outdoor living barn, and plantation silvopastures were also documented on multiple farms. Shade and a desire to maximize use of farm woodlands were primary reasons for silvopasture utilization. This research provides evidence that silvopastures are being used to diversify regional farms. For the practice to be advanced in the region further research is needed on the topic.

To read more, click HERE!

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