the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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a+ technology (adaptive, accessible, appropriate)

Examples of Questionable Applications of Technology:

  1. using garden sheers to trim your bangs
  2. building a forest fire to barbecue burgers for two
  3. mincing garlic with a machete
  4. driving a ton of steel to transport a 150 lbs human body across town
  5. relying on expensive, petroleum-reliant, highly-commodified tools to support innovative, unconventional, and ecologically-sound small farms

 

This week in the Food List, the focus is on Appropriate Technology— or, in other words, technology that suits its purposes (in scale, cost, application, etc.). The presented case studies presented prove that when it comes to sustainable, small-scale farming, bigger is not better and one size doesn’t necessarily fit all.

Continue reading


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job at cornell university extension in wilsboro, ny

On the job hunt? The good folks at Cornell are hiring!
ReelMower
The Cornell University Willsboro Research Farm has an opening for a seasonal field assistant. The employee will be responsible for helping to maintain the grounds and buildings on the Cornell Willsboro Research Farm.  Primary duties include mowing lawns and alleyways, trimming weeds and grasses around fences and buildings, and cleaning and maintaining farm buildings.  Additionally, the employee will assist with the field experiments at the research farm.  Specific duties include planting, weeding, harvesting, sample processing, data collection and data entry.
This is a full time (39 hours/week) position that runs from May to October.  Interested persons should contact Michael Davis at mhd11@cornell.edu.
 
Cornell University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer and educator.


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gmo right to know and april 28 rally in new york

Big money is trying to kill the effort to label GMOs in the state of New York, but GMO Right to Know bills are moving forward. If you’re a New Yorker, please attend the GMO Labeling Rally & Lobby Day at the NY State Capitol in Albany on Tuesday, April 28, 2015. Reserve your seat on a bus today!

Logo with green state of New York shape and "GMO Free NY" text on top of the imageUpdate on GMO Labeling Bills in New York
The GMO labeling bill numbers you need to know are NY State Assembly bill A.617 and NY State Senate bill S.485. Bill A.617 was successfully voted out of the NY Assembly Consumer Affairs and Protection committee in early March and is now awaiting a vote in the Codes committee. The companion bill in the Senate, S.485, has not yet seen any action; it’s in the Consumer Protection committee and will hopefully be voted on soon.

Vote With Your Voices and Feet
Assembly members need to be told to push Bill A.617  forward because people should be able to know if it’s GMO. Go to www.gmofreeny.net to learn how to contact your Assembly member and Senator and what you should say when you call. Even better if you can stop by one of their offices in Albany in person!

Rally for Your Right to Know on April 28
On Tuesday, April 28th, 2015, the NY GMO Labeling Rally & Lobby Day will take place at the State Capitol in Albany, from 11:30 am – 3 pm. The rally will have food, great speakers, and like-minded people. Bus transportation is available from Manhattan, Westchester, Hudson Valley, Long Island, Rochester, Syracuse, Ithaca, and Binghamton and student scholarships are available.

No matter how you get there, just get there and make some NOISE in Albany! See this flyer for more information: April28Rally


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build farmer collaborations with cornell cooperative extension: april 9 & 10

Extension Workshops to Build Farmer Collaborations for Sales, Marketing and Delivery of Local Foods

Many farmers are teaming up to develop, market, and deliver multiple products to meet the needs of buyers interested in purchasing local foods. Cornell Cooperative Extension will hold workshops in Burrville, Canton and Plattsburgh to help farmers develop formal partnerships, cooperatives, and corporations.

The workshop agenda features Bobbie Severson of the Cooperative Enterprise Program of the Cornell Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, and panels of three farmers explaining their experiences with working together and the pro and cons of their particular systems.

‘These Extension workshops in Northern New York are timely as farmers there begin to look at developing food hubs. The option for building collaborations between farmers to market and deliver products can be attractive for implementing that type of project, and cooperative, group-action businesses not only strengthen farmers but enhance the local food sector and add vigor to local economies,’ Severson says.

‘Informal agreements or a memorandum of agreement may work for a while, but over time joint purchases of equipment and sharing income can lead partners to wanting more formal strategies. These workshops will help farmers develop those strategies,’ says co-organizer Anita Deming, executive director of Cornell Cooperative Extension of Essex County.

The Farmer Strategies for Working Together workshops have a $5 fee and are set for:

Thursday April 9, 1-3 pm, CCE Clinton County Meeting Room, 6064 State Route 22, Plattsburgh, to register: CCE Clinton County: 518-561-7450 or CCE Essex County: 518-962-4810 x0

Thursday April 9, 7-9 pm, CCE St. Lawrence County Extension Learning Farm Classroom, 2043 State Highway 68, Canton, to register: CCE St. Lawrence County: 315-379-9192

Friday April 10, 1-3 pm, Farm Credit East Office, 25417 NY Route 12, Burrville, to register: CCE Lewis County, 315-376-5270 and CCE Jefferson County, 315-788-8450.


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sunday reading: foodland from tni

image via thenewinquiry.com

Check out The New Inquiry Adam Rothstein’s 2012 interview with Nicola Twilley, who works for Columbia University’s Studio-X, is co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and runs the Edible Grography blog. They discuss food piracy, refrigeration geography, and strategic food reserves.

Adam Rothstein: How would you describe the Edible Geography blog project?

Nicola Twilley: I had too many diverse interests in food space, culture, naturally built and virtual landscapes, and environmental issues. Rather than having a website where I write about everything that I find interesting, I force myself to go through the lens of food.

I initially resisted launching a “food blog,” because of the image of a food blog being just “pictures of cupcakes” or “what I had for lunch,” or “ten exciting new ways to prepare quinoa.” But I think of it as a frame, frequently on an entirely different perspective to a story that I might otherwise miss. It relates to stories of domestication in agriculture, bioarchaeology, culture, technology, and almost anything else. There’s not a lot of stuff you can’t address through the lens of food, so although I call it a constraint, it hardly is at all.

CONTINUE READING


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spring beef week programs – march 24-27

From March 24-27, the Cornell Cooperative Extension will hold 2015 Spring Beef Week programs in Canton, Malone, Watertown and Westport, New York to help farmers better understand what beef buyers want and how to produce a consistent supply of cattle that meet their demand. Cattle prices are high, leading some farmers to wonder if beef could become part of their farm’s offerings. At the same time, existing beef producers want to know if there are things they can do to better capture and sustain a viable market into the future.

Two cows grazing hillside beneath tree

Courtesy of the Farm Security Administration photo archive, Library of Congress

The 2015 Spring Beef Week programs will be held at the following times and locations:

Tuesday, March 24 at 6:30pm
Westport, NY: CCE of Essex County office, 3 Sisco Street
Register with Anita Deming at 518-962-4810 or ald6@cornell.edu

Wednesday, March 25 at 6:30pm
Malone, NY: USDA Building, 151 Finney Boulevard
Register with Diane Dumont at 518-483-7403 or drd9@cornell.edu

Thursday, March 26 at 6:30pm
Canton, NY: CCE St. Lawrence Extension Learning Farm, 2043 State Hwy 68
Register with Betsy Hodge at 315-379-9192 or bmf9@cornell.edu

Friday, March 27 at 6:30pm
Watertown, NY: CCE Jefferson County, 203 N. Hamilton Street
Register with Ron Kuck at 315-788-8450 or rak76@cornell.edu

If you have questions or would like more information about any of the above events, please visit the Spring Beef Week site or contact Betsy Hodge, CCE St. Lawrence County at 315-379-9192 or bmf9@cornell.edu.

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