the irresistible fleet of bicycles


Leave a comment

job working on a cooperatively-run horse farm in NY for the 2017 season

screen-shot-2016-04-26-at-5-39-49-pm

Abode Farm is Hiring for 2017!

 Abode Farm— is a cooperatively run 8-acre horse-powered farm in New Lebanon, NY. We produce vegetables, herbs, and flowers for our summer and winter CSA, wholesale accounts, schools, and farmers markets. Our farm is located on historic Mount Lebanon, a diverse ecological site; with wetlands, ponds, streams, woodlands, and meadows. We work to honor this diversity in our growing practices with a holistic farm system that builds soil, protects wildlife, and produces healthy crops.

Practices— Our bio-extensive farm system focuses on diversity, cover cropping, composts, mineral amendments, and careful crop rotation. We do not use any synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides on our farm. We rely on our Belgian draft horses as our primary source of power, which helps us stay light on the land, and sensitive to the biological rhythms we work with. We also use a small Farmall Cub tractor for bed-preparation and light tillage.

Community— The farm is a dynamic educational and community space. We share our land with The Abode of the Message—a Sufi spiritual community, and Flying Deer Nature Center. It’s a busy place and there are always events going on. At the farm, we host many performances, workshops, potlucks, artists’ visits, and educational programs throughout the season. Community outreach and food access are extremely important to us. We are looking for someone who has an interest in community organizing, food justice, and education in addition to holistic agriculture.

Abode Farm Job Description

Seeking –  2 Full-time farm co-workers
Start/End – April-November
Schedule – TuesdayFriday 7:30-5pm, weekend chore rotation
Spring and Fall hours 8:30am-5pm
                   35-40hrs/week—potential for extra hours
Compensation – TBD, $10/hr or Housing & Stipend

Full job description below the break! Continue reading


Leave a comment

man writes the NYT advice column in a panic that his son want might volunteer on an organic farm

549173_10151705705295046_1775168078_n

This one here is a good laugh for all of us who may or may not be the black sheep of the family. (My grandma clipped the above cartoon out of the New Yorker and promptly sent it to me without any card when I started farming six years ago. I like to think she was smiling about it, but it’s hard to tell.)

Some man wrote the New York Times “Social Q” column last week, explaining that he is “not paying $60,000 a year (after taxes) for him to become a farmer.” And, for once in a blue moon, the NYT writer abstained from millenial-bashing to explain that the parent might consider seeking out “less controlling ways to teach him the consequences of his professional choices.” Read the full clip below the break, and maybe consider that abysmal attitudes like this are best countered with a donation to your friendly local farm advocacy organization. We still need all the help we can get! Continue reading


Leave a comment

organic grains and innovation on GH radio

Screen-Shot-2017-01-10-at-4.07.30-PM.png

Listen to the podcast here!

Ben Dobson grew up in Hillsdale, New York, on a small organic farm and started his first agricultural business in 2001. After two years on his own, he joined forces with his father Ted Dobson and managed the fields at his salad and tomato farm in Sheffield, MA, from 2003 through 2006. Since then Ben has started, managed, and overseen the sale of two agricultural businesses: One of which, Atlantic Organics, founded in 2007, was the largest organic vegetable farm in the state of Maine. The other, a company called Locally Known LLC, founded in 2008, was a salad processing company that sold pre-packaged ready to eat salads to Whole Foods Market, Hannaford Bros. and Trader Joe’s supermarkets in the Northeast and Mid Atlantic regions.

In 2013, Ben joined Stone House Farm as the Organic Transition Manager, and in 2016 he became their Farm Manager. He planned and oversaw the implementation of an organic transition on the 2,200-acre Stone House Farm property, and developed a non-GMO feed and grain business to sell their grain. The farm is now expanding its grain operation to include organic grain from other farms in the region.

Ben also heads Hudson Carbon: a research project conducting long term research across several sites on Stone House Farm and two neighboring farms. Hudson Carbon monitors the economic impacts and ecological effects of organic farming systems regarding carbon sequestration. Collaborators in this project include the Rodale Institute, The Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, and Scenic Hudson. This winter Hudson Carbon will be launching a website with sections dedicated to farmers, science, and the public.


Leave a comment

great reasons (and three well- paid positions) to move to the Catskills (for)

history

Image from the Otswego Land Trust. P.S. They’re hiring for an Executive Director.

Tianna Kennedy, of Star Route Farm in the Catskills of NY, contributed this compelling argument to young agrarians and agrarian-minded professionals. She says, so you think rural areas like the Catskills are a dead-end: you’re wrong. Make sure to read beyond the break to see the three amazing farm positions she’s spotlighted– two “professional” jobs and one farming incubator.

“So many great Ag jobs up at the moment in the Catskills.

People, it is time we for real reverse the trend towards urbanization – strong self-sufficient local communities and the thriving informal economies and the distribution routes they engender are more resilient than vulnerable urban centers.   They are pockets of resistance and value. Quality of life skyrockets proportionate to distance from urban centers.  Plus, the clean air, water (to swim in as well as to drink), farm-fresh food, views! The country has it all.  Continue reading


Leave a comment

urban farm manager position in troy, ny

13654270_10154374263508711_3089444318394634608_n

Capital Roots in Troy, NY is seeking an experienced farm manager for its two-acre urban farm. The position is a full-time growing role, but job description also heavily emphasizes volunteer management, mentorship, and educational skills. Hourly wage offered plus benefits. See full job description here and contact Matthew Schueler, the Grow Center Manager at edcenter@capitalroots.org.

Capital Roots is a nonprofit in Troy that is over 30 years old and manages a diverse array of programs and spaces to increase food access, promote green spaces, and encourage food and environmental justice around the city.


Leave a comment

new york certified organic meeting

capture

This years NYCO meeting program dates are up! If you’re in the NY area this a great opportunity to meet with folks and representatives from around the state working in organic agriculture. The event brings grain and dairy farmers together with guest speakers to discuss organic crops and dairy production.

The 2017 dates are January 10, February 14 and March 13. Each program begins at 10 AM in Jordan Hall, 630 West North Street at the New York State Agricultural Experimental Station, Geneva, NY. Continue reading


Leave a comment

on radio tues dec. 13: farmer, straw-bale builder, and all around agriculture do-er Erica Frenay

919091_586779404696437_1547676781_o

Live on Heritage Radio’s Greenhorns Radio show this Tuesday, we’ll interview farmer Erica Frenay of Shelterbelt Farm in Ithaca New York. Erica also works for Cornell’s Small Farms Institute, and her bio on their page should give you an idea of how many rich topics of conversation this interview might follow.

Erica began working for the Small Farms Program in 2006. A former co-manager of Cornell’s student-run farm, she graduated from Cornell in 1998 and moved to Oregon to serve in AmeriCorps. Erica spent 6 years in the Pacific Northwest, working as Project Coordinator for an agricultural land trust and then as Executive Director of an urban educational farm in Portland. In 2005 she completed a 2-year program in Holistic Management. During her long and indirect journey back to Ithaca, Erica and her husband lived on a permaculture farm and nursery in the San Juan Islands for a year, and spent another year working on farms and building with clay and straw in New Mexico, Wisconsin, and Australia. They returned to Ithaca to settle down in the summer of 2005, and five years later started Shelterbelt Farm. Now she works part-time for the Small Farms Program and part-time producing sheep, beef, duck eggs, honey, fruit, and veggies on her farm.