the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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FREE lifetime lease on a 65 acre land trust parcel in WV

3 plenty of garden space

The Appalacian Catholic Worker has put out a call for someone to rent a beloved but human-starved piece of land in West Virginia. [Edit: please note that this is NOT a Greenhorns offer. The following text is from the APC, whose contact information is towards the bottom of the post.] Read on for more information:

OUR LAND TRUST HAS A 65 ACRE TRACT THAT IS CURRENTLY EXPERIENCING PEOPLELESSNESS ***** (contrary to urban homelessness, many rural homesteads suffer from peoplelessness, sometimes chronic/cyclical) One of Appalachian Catholic Worker’s community projects is being on the board of directors for the “Regional Land Trust of West Virginia.” RLTWV lands have been protected since 1969, and are close ‘cousins’ with “Trust in the Hills” land trust in WV, started by CWers, Chuck Smith and Sandy Adams (dubbed by Dorothy Day herself as the quintessential examples of CW farmers!)

Currently, RLTWV has a 65 acre tract -mostly wooded hillsides – that would be the perfect place to start your own homestead or CW community. Get a free life-time lease for: – About 10 acres of cleared flat bottom for a big garden or pasturing small livestock; – a pond up on the hill – the old hippie house needs lots of TLC and skilled handiwork or just be lived in as a new one is built – wood stove, water well and pump, electric, telephone land line, indoor compost toilet – and the land taxes this year were only $471.00 !!!

The majority of the board wants to let it go (sell it! God forbid!) because, – since this tract was annexed in 2013, we haven’t been able to find conscientious care-takers who don’t trash the place, or potential lease-holders who can stick around very long. – The board doesn’t want to have to afford (and I can’t myself) the additional taxes on top of the other lands we are responsible for. – We’re an older, or already-swamped, voluntarily-poor board, without the energy or time to clean up the messes or maintain the land.

Mission of RLTWV is … 1. Providing access to land for the landless; 2. Promoting the ecological use of land for the common good; 3. Protecting land from speculation; 4. Encouraging a new relationship with land that sees it as the common heritage of all people, not as the private property of a few, nor as a commodity to be exchanged; 5. Developing networks of support and fellowship that will strengthen those on trust lands in times of need or ecological threat to the land; 6. Supporting efforts for land reform everywhere.

Looks like a job for SUPER CWs or their counterparts!! Your new address would be: 881 Slab Fork Rd. Spencer, WV 25276 about 10 miles from town (last 2 are gravel), relatively reliable transportation would be needed. There are currently FIVE other CW houses spread out around the state of WV each doing different ministries. You’d have an automatic extended intentional community AND a wonderful, tightly knit, REGION-WIDE network of fellow radically-minded, environmentally friendly folks, catholic, not-so-Catholic, and not-Catholic. I’d totally hook you up. Contact me if you are interested…Jeannie Kirkhope 304-927-5798 or jeannie@acwfarm.com

AND FORWARD / SHARE / POST / TWEET FAR-AND-WIDE It would be a tragic social sin if this sweet little piece of land in the beautiful hills of West Virgina were to be treated as a commodity. It hasn’t had a drop of pesticide on it for over 30 years. —


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want to know why a large portion of the us doesn’t trust big ag or government findings?

graphic_childrensblood

Source found Here

There are 60,000 unregulated chemicals in use by chemical companies right now and the EPA/FDA/USDA aren’t regulating. This is a frightening David-vs-Goliath New York Times piece which is well worth the read. Here are a couple snippets:

Bilott learned from the documents that 3M and DuPont had been conducting secret medical studies on PFOA for more than four decades. In 1961, DuPont researchers found that the chemical could increase the size of the liver in rats and rabbits. A year later, they replicated these results in studies with dogs. PFOA’s peculiar chemical structure made it uncannily resistant to degradation. It also bound to plasma proteins in the blood, circulating through each organ in the body. In the 1970s, DuPont discovered that there were high concentrations of PFOA in the blood of factory workers at Washington Works. They did not tell their workers this. In 1981, 3M — which continued to serve as the supplier of PFOA to DuPont and other corporations — found that ingestion of the substance caused birth defects in rats. After 3M shared this information, DuPont tested the children of pregnant employees in their Teflon division. Of seven births, two had eye defects. DuPont did not make this information public…

…But Bilott faced a vexing legal problem. PFOA was not a regulated substance. It appeared on no federal or state list of contaminants. How could Bilott claim that 70,000 people had been poisoned if the government didn’t recognize PFOA as a toxin — if PFOA, legally speaking, was no different than water itself?

 

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obama vetoes keystone xl pipeline bill

Whew.

Meanwhile, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index has ranked Kentucky and West Virginia as having the lowest health and well being than any other state in the US for the sixth year in a row. Is it coincidental that the states with the most mountaintop removal have the worst health and the worst outlook? This study, like all the rest involving human health, falls on deaf ears with politicians and the agencies that are supposed to be protecting us.  What can you do to help us make them listen? Put your foot down!


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west virginia’s road map…

for the Food Economy. Download it HERE

“There has never been a better time to go into farming,” said Paul Mock, a well-established hydroponic farmer in Morgan County, in a speech at the 2012 WV Small Farm Conference. Though it may be surprising news at a time when America is losing farmers nationwide, more and more West Virginia farmers — and agricultural experts — are starting to say the same thing. Demand for local food in West Virginia has grown rapidly over the past few years, and the rush to meet that demand has opened up a myriad of new business opportunities, as well as chance to improve access to healthy food for our communities.

In response to these growing opportunities, the West Virginia Food & Farm Coalition is pleased to release West Virginia’s Road Map for the Food Economy, a statewide “food charter” designed to help focus, measure and celebrate West Virginia’s progress towards stronger local food systems. Created through a series of public forums, the Road Map provides an action plan for seizing key opportunities in West Virginia’s food and farm economy. Its action items address both policy and practice, and include things that can be done by ordinary individuals and community groups as well as agencies and the state legislature. Partners in organizing the forums and developing the Road Map included the West Virginia University Extension Service and its WV Small Farm Center, the Office of Child Nutrition and Office of Career and Technical Instruction at the West Virginia Department of Education, the West Virginia Department of Agriculture, West Virginia State University and the West Virginia Community Development Hub. Continue reading