the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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funny in flannel (the greatest tv show that you didn’t even know you were missing)

Thanks be this morning to Canadians and and the internet! This week, we discovered that there are SO MANY episodes of Canadian sketch series The Red and Green Show up on youtube. Haven’t heard of The Red and Green Show? It’s a Home-Improvement-meets-Portlandia-meets-Cartalk kind of affair– only with quirky little original jingles in every scene. Sounds too gloriously campy to be true, you say? Well don’t take my word for it!

 


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canada: stewards of irreplaceable lands (SOIL) seeks apprentices!

farm_2

SOIL links Canadian farmers willing to take on and train apprentices with folks wanting to work and learn on an organic farm using sustainable practices. We aim to facilitate apprenticeships which transfer lasting knowledge to both the farmer and the apprentice. Established in 1989 as a non-profit organization, our goals are:

  • To encourage the growth of sustainable agriculture in Canada
  • To expose potential apprentices to a rural lifestyle. For those with little or no farming experience an apprenticeship can offer a valuable hands on learning environment in which to acquire the basic skills or even provide the basis for an agricultural career.
  • To assist the farmer with the necessary support required to successfully run their organic operation. The farmers and farm community can also benefit greatly from the influx of new ideas, energy and enthusiasm of apprentices.

SOIL acts as a directory that links farm-hosts and prospective apprentices. All listings are submitted to this site by farm employers. Stewards of Irreplaceable Land makes no claims of any kind about content, accuracy, suitability, intent, comprehensiveness, or availability of positions. SOIL makes no representations or guarantees about positions listed on its website and is not responsible for safety, wages, working conditions, or other aspects of employment. It is the responsibility of prospective apprentices to take all necessary precautions when interviewing for or accepting positions, and he/she is solely responsible for obtaining necessary information concerning the employers, using caution and common sense. It is the responsibility of host farms to be aware of federal and provincial labour laws related to hiring apprentices and for apprentice training for full on-farm health and safety. SOIL provides the listing only as a public service, and the listings do not imply any recommendation by the organization.

Please feel free to contact them with any questions using the form on their website, or by emailing soilapprenticeships@gmail.com.


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hydroelectric damn threatens farmland in BC

peace river flats Don Hoffman

Impact of Site C Dam on B.C. Farmland Far More Dire Than Reported, Local Farmers Show

By Sarah Cox • Thursday, January 7, 2016 – 12:43
Reposted from DESMOG CANADA

“Clay and Katy Peck are just the type of young farming family that B.C. Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick says his government wants to support to ensure “a reliable food source for years to come.”

The Pecks own a 65-hectare farm in the Agricultural Land Reserve overlooking the Peace River, and are preparing for organic certification of a fruit and vegetable business to serve the northern area around Fort St. John.

The couple’s farm is high enough above the Peace River that it is not included in BC Hydro’s tally of 6,469 hectares of farmland — an area larger than all the farmland in Richmond — that will be destroyed by the Site C dam and its vast reservoir.

But the Pecks, along with other Peace Valley farmers, stand to lose significant amounts of farmland and crops to Site C in previously uncounted ways. The likely impact of Site C on agricultural land has been routinely underreported and will be far more dire than widely expected, according to scientists and information found in BC Hydro reports.

Work on the $8.8 billion dam project began in August and continues around the clock despite three on-going court cases by First Nations, missing federal government permits, and BC Hydro’s continuing failure to demonstrate the need for Site C electricity.

In addition to the agricultural land BC Hydro counts as permanently lost to Site C, another 5,900 hectares of farmland falls within what BC Hydro calls a “stability impact zone” and is at risk of destruction. BC Hydro insists a further 1,125 hectares of farmland — an area about the size of four Stanley Parks — will be lost only on a “temporary” basis during the next 10 years, but farmers and a soil scientist question whether topsoil on the land can ever be replaced.

The list of agricultural land lost temporarily to Site C includes 203 hectares of agricultural land in a Flood Impact Zone that may experience “crop losses when flooding occurs,” according to BC Hydro. Collapsing Peace River banks will create a landslide-generated wave that will sweep over an additional 174 hectares of prime farmland. Since water will not remain on the fields forever, BC Hydro does not include these areas in its tally of permanently lost farmland, even though flooding and waves can cause soil erosion and leave behind debris.

“In my view this is a permanent loss,” says Vancouver soil scientist Eveline Wolterson. “It’s like a tsunami. Essentially what it does is it eats away at topsoil. It will all get washed into the reservoir. They’ll never be able to restore those soils.””

Read the whole article on DESMOGCANADA!


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age of the farmer

65 is the average age of farmers in Canada, and there are not enough young farmers to replace them… How did we get here? In the summer of 2015, Eva Verbeeck and Spencer MacDonald embarked on a trip throughout the Pacific Northwest to produce a short film on young farmers that would accompany her photo story for a variety of publications. This film is an attempt to express some of the thoughts and feelings of the young farmers they stayed with. Hopefully a little bit of justice was done for all the young farmers out there.


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corroding our democracy (big oil, the canadian government, and the silencing of environmental science)

Democracy Now on the (nearly) unbelievable story of they extent to which Canada’s oil industry has stifled the country’s democracy, silenced its scientists, and crippled its environmentalist movements. It is bananas, and it is worse than you would have imagined.

“Well first of all, the government has shut down the majority of scientific research in the country that had to do with climate change. This is a government in denial […] They fired hundreds of scientists, and the ones that are left are being told that they can’t release their research to us, even though it’s tax-funded research. They are also being told that they can’t talk to the press unless they have to have a handler and it’s an approved interview. They have to have a handler from the prime minister’s office. So the scientists I’ve talked to, they’re embarrassed; they’re frustrated; they’re protesting. Last week in Canada we had thousands of scientists hit the streets in their lab coats protesting the federal government because they can’t speak. They’re being muzzled.”

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