the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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the revival is real!

maine-sail-freight-greenhorns-lwrncbrn-piscataqua-cafe-Lo-Res-0138

Sailing Dog, a sail freight focused on sustainable trade in western Washington, comprised a list of the working sail’s around the world.  The twelve listed all share equally inspiring visions to that of the Maine Sail Freight. From moving fair-trade chocolate, rum, and coffee, to local farm produce, and meeting the needs of remote islands, sail-powered shipping is alive across the globe!

If you know of a working sail not listed, make sure to contact them. Many of the projects are open to new crew members as well. Take a ride on the open sea and build resiliency of local economy!


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local food by boat: the vermont sail freight project

Plucked from Civileats

Maritime museums are nostalgic places full of black and white photographs of old sails and rugged seafarers. Ornate boats hint at centuries of technological progress and suggest that craftsmanship has suffered as a result. But the old became new again recently at the Hudson Maritime Museum in New York, when a sailboat arrived to sell agricultural goods from upriver. Visitors caught a glimpse of a river-based local food economy—a vestige of the past and a harbinger of an alternative future.

For the last two summers, the Vermont Sail Freight Project (VSFP) has sailed a boat named Ceres down the Hudson River, carrying all manner of small-scale, artisanal farm products to eager consumers in New York City and at river towns along the way. It has carried everything from grains to maple syrup, honey, carrots, pickles, preserves, herbal teas, goat milk caramels, flour, and beans, selling roughly $50,000 worth of goods in one trip.

– See more at: http://civileats.com/2014/08/27/local-food-by-boat-the-vermont-sail-freight-project/#sthash.028p4VMe.dpuf


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vermont sail freight flies again!

Mark your calendars.
And stay in the loop!

ceres

  • Mechanicville, NY  Saturday June 7th.  Market at the dock.  Hours TBA
  • Waterford, NY  Sunday June 8th.  Attending Waterford Farmers Market 10am – 1pm
  • Coxsackie, NY Wednesday June 11th, Attending Coxsackie Farmers Market 4-7 pm
  • Croton-on-Hudson NY, Ferry Sloops, Shattemuc Yacht Club, June 18th, Market, hours TBA
  • Croton-on-Hudson, Clearwater Festival, June 21st-22nd
  • Manhattan, NY, New Amsterdam Farmers Market, June 28th, 11-4pm


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sail freight news

Ceres is preparing to launch again for her second season delivering Vermont goods on Lake Champlain and the Hudson.

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We are looking forward to heading down the river again in June, and the highlight of the second voyage will be the Clearwater Festival, June 21 & 22 in Croton-on-Hudson, NY.  Also known as Clearwater’s Great Hudson River Revival, it’s a celebration of the river we share, environmental activism, music, sailing, and especially this year, of the legendary Pete Seeger.  Will you join us?

Dine Aboard at the Falls
Last year, we hosted dinner on Ceres for one level of Kickstarter donors.  The combination of fresh food from our cargo, evening light on the falls, and the setting of a handmade sailing barge made these gatherings magical.  To raise funds for 2014 operation costs and to celebrate a new year of VSFP, we’re returning to host dinner at the falls.  You’re invited!

Friday, May 30, 2014
7pm, $150 for two 

The evening includes a tour of Ceres, conversation with project director Erik Andrus, drinks, and a meal prepared with local ingredients from our participating farmers and producers.
Please reply to Willowell with your reservation.  This will be an intimate gathering of 8 guests.  Based on response, we plan to host more dinners throughout the coming season.  Please contact us if you would be interested in attending a future dinner aboard!

We can’t wait to get sailing!

http://www.vermontsailfreightproject.org/


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sail freight press!

Ceres arrives in NYC today!

Food Matters | Fifteen Tons of Groceries, Sailing Down the Hudsonvsfp logo

Now that urban rooftops are buzzing with beehives and C.S.A. deliveries are the new FreshDirect, where does the slow-food movement go next? One key issue confronting the locavore movement is transportation — the “to” in “farm to table.”

Before the Industrial Revolution, most food was regional by necessity, shipped via wind-powered boats. Urban waterfronts were vibrant centers of commerce and community. Seeking a more sustainable way to get his grain to market, the Vermont farmer Erik Andrus conceived the Vermont Sail Freight Project to find out if this model could work again today. In April, he raised more than $15,000 on Kickstarter to build a 39-foot-long plywood sail barge named Ceres (after the Roman goddess of agriculture). The Greenhorns, an Essex, N.Y.-based farmer advocacy group, and the Willowell Foundation, a nonprofit education organization, signed on as partners to raise additional funds, handle the project’s logistics and recruit farmers and volunteers.

“We’re at an inflection point,” said Severine von Tscharner Fleming, the founder of the Greenhorns. “Can we, as farmers, collaborate on a distribution system that matches our values and preserves the craft economy?” Continue reading

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