the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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how rural new mexico shares water during drought

“We have the wrong world view here in the West, the idea of unlimited expansion, and it just doesn’t work,” she says. “I think land-based people who generally live on a small scale know that there’s a limited good. The basic idea is that shortages are shared.” Sylvia Rodriguez, professor emerita of anthropology at UNM

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Photo credit J.R. Logan/Taos News

Norbert Ledoux beams with pride when he sees his acequia brimming with spring runoff on a sunny May morning.

Ledoux, a young farmer from Talpa, has 2 acres of beans, peas and other vegetables planted. Water in the ditch likely means a bountiful harvest. Enough crops to feed his friends and family, with plenty left over to sell at his roadside farm stand.

“This year, we have a such an abundance that we can’t possibly use it all,” says Ledoux. “Everybody is content.”

Three years ago, things weren’t so cheerful.

On this same day in 2013, there was less than one-fifth the flow in this stream, the Río Grande del Rancho, which feeds more than a dozen other acequias — community-operated irrigation ditches that double as political subdivisions in New Mexico. By the middle of June, there was almost no water at all. Amid that devastating drought, acequia leaders revived a water sharing agreement originally drafted to weather the brutal drought of the ‘30s.

At the time, Ledoux was a mayordomo – a ditch boss who monitors and manages an acequia. He says that first deal was struck to help the whole valley get through the dry spell.

“Everybody was losing their crops,” Ledoux explains. “So a few ancestors of mine – uncles of mine and my grandfather – got together with the mayordomos and implemented this water share project.”

Read the whole High Country News article HERE!

 


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baltimore food ecology documentary

This video provides an in-depth look at the Baltimore food system. It tells this story through the eyes of numerous players, including a food warehouse worker, a grocery store owner, a local food historian, and activists trying to improve access to food in their schools and communities. Nine MICA students spent a school year working with their professor, Hugh Pocock, on BFED. CLF’s staff provided technical support to the students, helping them refine their research goals and identify key informants to interview. The students’ journey through their local food system — where supermarkets are scarce and diet-related diseases common — was an investigation of why the food system comes up short for many city residents. In the end, they find hope for a brighter food future in some unexpected places.


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premature deaths on the rise in rural areas

Where you live should not determine how long you live. New research shows it does.

Americans have enjoyed increasingly longer lives over time. Advances in medicine, a decline in fatal car accidents, and falling violent crime rates mean we are living longer.

But new research shows a reversal of this trend for some. If you are rich, geography doesn’t matter. Your expected lifespan is still increasing. But if you are poor, geography matters. In parts of the country we see an actual reversal of the trend.

geography of life expectancy map

The trend is also correlated with increasingly fractious politics. The Washington Post found that the places where middle-aged whites are dying fastest are the same places where presidential candidate Donald Trump is performing best.

To read more of this article from the Center for Rural Affairs, click HERE!


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remember the awesome audio.almanac

yeah, that was fun!
Greenhorns 2013 Farmers Almanac

Download these audio tracks for listening in the car or truck, and in the greenhouse. Consider recording lectures and songs for others for next year’s New Farmer’s Audio Almanac. Email them to Almanac@thegreenhorns.net. If you are still unfamiliar with the audio capacities of your smartphone, ask your smart 15 year old cousin to help you access Stitcher and Heritage Radio Network lectures on your smartphone. The Association for Cultural Equity has many recordings by Alan Lomax. Archive.org has thousands of tracks. Really, it’s worth your time to figure it out.


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fork to fork

11th June sees the second year of the Franklin Fork to Fork Festival, a celebration of food, drink, music and the buzz of a strong, engaged and active community!   There will be food from Kitty Fisher’s, the River Café, etc etc etc…..

The aim is to raise funds for the Open Air Classroom project at Ark Franklin Primary Academy where we are building an inspirational garden space that will be open to both the school and the local community.  The aim of the garden is to provide an enriching, exciting and educational space for children to learn the fundamental elements of healthy nutrition alongside mathematics, English, science and the wider curriculum, bringing their learning to life.  A place where pupils and the wider community can experience the joy of discovery, solve problems, be creative, develop self-confidence and mature both socially and emotionally.

Our plans include a pond, raised beds, an outdoor kitchen, space for productions and a weather station, affording our children daily opportunities to physically engage with their environment.  We hope the garden can help reverse the trend that currently sees children in the UK spending less time in green spaces than the population of our prisons.  Our garden will give children access to the outdoors, reversing trends in obesity and childhood depression and giving our children space to reflect and grow.  To visit this website and watch the video, click here!


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french farm hack’s registration open now!

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You will have the opportunity to take part in a wealth of activities: introductory sessions to metal work, talks, workshops, conferences, etc. In this form you can tell us the activities that interest you the most, and help us to put together a programme that suits your needs!
In order to keep things simple, we advise you to tick “Definitely” for:
– the ongoing workshop which you are most interested in
– a maximum of 2 introductory workshops
The aim is not only to tell us what you’re interested in, but also what you feel you will be able to do, without trying to cram in too much.

To take a look and to book,  click HERE!


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eddy awards readers’ choice voting is now live!

The EDDYs celebrates editorial excellence among nearly 90 publishers of Edible Communities covering the local food landscape across the US and Canada. A panel of 50+ esteemed judges selected the finalists, and now it’s up to you to pick the Readers’ Choice winners.  Vote daily in each category through June 8! To vote, Click HERE!

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