the irresistible fleet of bicycles

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apocalypse pig

The last antibiotics begin to fail…


On Thursday, researchers from several Chinese, British and US universities announced in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases that they have identified a new form of resistance, to the very last-ditch drug colistin—and that it is present in both meat animals and people, probably comes from agricultural use of that drug, can move easily among bacteria, and may already be spreading across borders.

This is very bad news. To read more, click HERE.

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cobia: it’s for dinner? (this is bogus)


We are here to call out this bogus fish farming article from the April 2014 issue of National Geographic on a “pioneering” fish farmer in Panama. “The Other White Meat” follows Brian O’Hanlon, who’s working to make Cobia, a little-known species native to mid-atlantic and indo-pacific waters, a challenger to the dinner paradigm of salmon and sea bass. Why? They say it may be cheaper, more environmentally-friendly, and humane to produce.

“O’Hanlon’s farm, which is part of a company he founded called Open Blue, wants to buck 4,000 years of human innovation and farm fish back in the ocean. He says that raising an animal in its natural habitat means it will be healthier and taste better and, with the right technology, grow far more efficiently. Some have said he’s pioneering a new form of aquaculture. O’Hanlon is on his way to shipping 250 tons of fish each month, a respectable haul for a midsize company under ten years old. Every few days, planes take what once swam in his underwater cages off to Asia, Europe, and North America. He started the operation in Panama in 2009, and last year, for the first time, demand exceeded supply.”

Read more on the National Geographic website.

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In their call for signatories, the organizers of the World Forum on Access to land write:

“The current situation – persistence of hunger, population growth, exclusion, massive unemployment, environmental crisis and loss of food sovereignty – as well as the persistence of acquisitions, leases and land concessions, invite us all to revisit the issue of access to land and productive resources. Though shareholders of large-scale projects often obtain a return on investment, their overall economic efficiency – and, in particular, the interests of concerned populations and their generations to follow – are far from guaranteed.

Will the choice to promote agricultural companies based on the production of a small number of commodities, the heavy use of synthetic inputs and fossil fuels, and the employment of salaried workers result in a significant increase in production and wealth? Will it create jobs and income for hundreds of millions of those active today by way of exclusion? And likewise for as much or more who are expected to enter the labor market? Will the agricultural revolution to come, capable of both feeding 9 billion people and giving work to the greatest number while eradicating hunger, be based, as in the past, on a massive replacement of labour by capital? How to ensure that the principles enunciated in the context of “the voluntary guidelines” will be actually translated into action respecting the rights of rural populations and promoting sustainable development?
Finally, the issue of rights and “commons” on the agenda of international discussions seems, in our opinion, in need of attention again. The massive monopolizing of the planet’s resources, beyond the diversity of its forms, reflects their everexpanding commodification in the name of growth and worldwide welfare. But this leads to ignorance of the historical, social, ecological, cultural and political dimensions of the current dynamics, and minimization of their impacts.

In this context, it seems necessary to re-engage on the issue of human rights. Specifically, people’s rights of equitable access to land, water and natural resources, and to implement production systems according to their ecological, economical, cultural and technical choices, in coherence with the common interest.

We call on civil society organisations and governmental institutions to mobilise and launch a global forum on access to land and natural resources. It is essential to debate the analyses and proposals related to current developments and their consequential, major problems. We call for the creation of such a forum in order to identify and implement the most effective solutions.”

Learn more at and sign the call!

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how long has big oil believed in climate change?

As the Union of Concerned Scientists unveiled in their July 2015 report, The Climate Deception Dossiers, Exxon internally recognized climate change as fact in 1981– right before they went on to spent $30 million on research that would support climate change denial. Are we surprised? No. Is it important? Yes. Read more at The Leap.

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can costal urbanization happen without landscape architects?

A 2013 Lecture by Pierre Belanger at TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture, Chair of Landscape Architecture within lecture series “How Do You Landscape?”

Starting with the claim that Americans are “geographically illiterate,” Belanger explores the concept of urbanity, especially as it relates to our landscape infrastructure, and you probably haven’t heard anyone speak about urbanization with more nuance or innovative thought. The Harvard professor argues that not only is our land surface urbanized, but so are the ground deep beneath our feet, the air far above us, and most of the bodies of water along our shores. As these processes proliferate, Belanger argues for viewing “urbanity” within a more holistic context. Where do materials that build our cities come from? Where do our wastes go? How does development on land radically alter landscapes under the sea?

“Rather than trying to see the processes of changing climates, we need to essentially work with them. Because right now rather thinking of our urbanizations on coasts as downstream from all these larger inland processes, we should think of them as being upstream of this larger oceanic landscape that we are essentially urbanizing.”

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more fish in the sea

trout-539599_1280NPR’s The Salt on “Why 500 Million Seafood Meals Get Dumped in the Sea.”

Because I am willing to bet that– at least when it comes to the readers of this blog– the woman quoted at the end of the article is wrong.

“People don’t want to know all this,” she says. “In general, they just want to know what [color-coded label] to look for.”

This post brought to you by our continued excitement for Maine Sail Freight.

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corroding our democracy (big oil, the canadian government, and the silencing of environmental science)

Democracy Now on the (nearly) unbelievable story of they extent to which Canada’s oil industry has stifled the country’s democracy, silenced its scientists, and crippled its environmentalist movements. It is bananas, and it is worse than you would have imagined.

“Well first of all, the government has shut down the majority of scientific research in the country that had to do with climate change. This is a government in denial […] They fired hundreds of scientists, and the ones that are left are being told that they can’t release their research to us, even though it’s tax-funded research. They are also being told that they can’t talk to the press unless they have to have a handler and it’s an approved interview. They have to have a handler from the prime minister’s office. So the scientists I’ve talked to, they’re embarrassed; they’re frustrated; they’re protesting. Last week in Canada we had thousands of scientists hit the streets in their lab coats protesting the federal government because they can’t speak. They’re being muzzled.”


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