the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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biodiversity conference, harvard, april 30th

Coralhome

Announcing the following conference at Harvard on April 30th:

THE POWER AND PROMISE OF BIODIVERSITY: VISIONS OF RESTORING SEA, LAND, AND CLIMATE
Geological Lecture Hall
24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

The conference promises to “present the concepts, history, and processes for the restoration of biodiversity” in hopes that increasing global biodiversity can sequester carbon and not only stop, but actually reverse climate change. Tickets are $30 and you can register now on eventbrite. More information here!


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help the best climate movie of the year get out and get us together 

This movie. Speaks directly to the heart of climate change resistance.  It takes you to the brink of despair and then builds you back up. I cried. I danced. In fact, the whole audience danced, standing up out of their seats. And you will too.  Trust me.

Now, filmmaker Josh Fox (of Gasland) is touring the country, stopping in 100 cities, many of them threatened by fracking, mountain top removal, and pipeline construction to help unite small grassroots movements.

There is ONE DAY left to donate to the Kickstarter that Funds the tour, which you can do here! Josh is still $25000 from his goal, so boost, boost, boost!


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labor rights/ the history of this idea in america

A series of short films dealing with different aspects of the systemic challenge our country is facing. The first three—featuring PolicyLink’s Angela Glover Blackwell, MIT’s Phil Thompson, and Boston College’s Juliet Schor—have already been released, and we encourage you to view and share them. Additional films are forthcoming, and will eventually be gathered on a dedicated page of our website, currently being developed, to be launched early in the fall.

 

To read more, click HERE!


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the year that ended dangerously: the ETC’s ireverant, snarky, and spot-on end of year review

etc_kitty_kitty_cartoon

The ETC’s Report also contains this fabulous comic.

Every year, our friends at the ETC (stands for Action Group on Erosion, Technology, and Concentration) puts out an, as they say, “irreverent,” year-end recap– and this year’s is out now! We’ve compiled a brief list of the highlights from the 2015 edition of the ETC’s yearly End of Year Review:

  • Comparing itself to the Grinch that Stole Christmas when complaining about the Paris attacks, the ETC explains how in the proceedings the Climate Activists “lost time and ground that we can’t recover.”
  • Turns out phytoplankton are carbon sequesters.
  • The Good and the Bad news coming out of the tech sphere (gene drives, AI, Ben and Jerry’s, Technology Bank…)
  • Whimsical historical anecdotes from the year (good moral boosters)
  • And this favorite quote: ““Let’s be clear about this, our company was dishonest. And in my German words, we have totally screwed up.”
  • A not-to-be-missed reading list!
  • Clairvoyant prophecies regarding 2016.

Read it here!


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among other failures paris deal mentions agriculture a whopping zero times

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15,000 Parisians protesting the Climate Deal. photo by the New Internationalist

Maybe you heard that the Climate Summit in Paris had lead to an “landmark deal,” and you were as skeptical as we were. Maybe you also wondered how often the word “agriculture” appeared in the climate deal or how indigenous groups were responding to the agreement.

Feed your skepticism! Danny Chivers and Jess Worth of The New Internationalist provide a well-reasoned, data-driven, alternative perspective on the deal as a whole, that is a must read for anyone concerned about climate chance.

In order to have a decent chance of reaching that 1.5° target, we need to keep at least 80 percent of known fossil fuels in the ground, and urgently halt the exploration and extraction of new sources. We need to stop deforestation and reduce other greenhouse gases such as methane, by tackling major drivers such as the growth of animal agriculture. But the Paris agreement contains no mention of the words ‘fossil fuel’ – no coal, no oil, no gas – and not a whisper about the livestock, palm oil and other industries driving deforestation either. (Read more here!)

For Greenhorns, the absence of agriculture from the agreement is deeply troubling, as we agree with Slow Food, who released this press release over a month ago arguing that “only through a radical paradigm shift in the current system of food production, processing, distribution, consumption and waste can we hope to mitigate climate change.”

 


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here we go magic

meyers-farm

Tim Meyers, Meyers Farm. Bethel, Alaska. Photo: Meyers Farm website

NPR’s The Salt: “Alaskan Farmer Turns Icy Patch of Tundra Patch into a Breadbasket.”

But tapping that ultra-rich soil takes time. To prepare the land for farming, Meyers starts in June when the permafrost ground begins to melt a bit. He uses a tractor to clear the low-lying mossy lichen and other tundra plantlife that act as an insulator to keep the permafrost cold. Then, in July, he plows fields to loosen the soil and dislodge the remaining native plant roots.

In all, Meyers must spend as much as two years working a piece of land before he can plant it. And even then, the ground below the soil in which he farms is still ice.

Leif Albertson, who worked for Meyers for three summers prior to his current post as a Bethel-based extension agent for the University of Alaska, says Meyers’ farm is as magical as “Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. ” Visitors can transport themselves from the tundra to the jungle just by stepping into one of Meyers’ greenhouses. It could mean a difference of 40 degrees between the chilly tundra air and in the greenhouse.

If you’re curious about learning more, check out Meyer’s Farm website, which has photos, press, and audio from an interview with the farmer.

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