the irresistible fleet of bicycles

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how many bicycles would it take to power the internet?


Oh, just “a mere two billion bike generators, with 8 billion people pedal- ing.” That’s right, as it turns out, the entire population of the earth (and then some!) would need to pedal at once to power the internet by bike generator.

How do we know? Well, we were curious, and so we did an internet search to find that a smart lady named Jane Anne Morris had already asked the question in her essay “Eat, Sleep, Click: The Bicycle-Powered Internet.”

I didn’t check her math, but the logic seems sound. Oh man, guys, this entreating read is  going to make you rethink some things…

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did you watch hillary and bernie debate?

Time to pay attention. You can stream the debate here:

One thing we noticed: ZERO mention food, farmers, or agriculture –  not in the context of public health or climate change.

We are also not sure why CNN isn’t hosting a easy-to-find full length debate video and lively comment section! The media prefers to offer you the soundbytes – instead of the discussion (“the debate in 2 minutes”), but don’t fall for this.
Watch the whole thing, FORM YOUR OWN OPINION.
(Oh, our opinion you ask? Well, you can really learn just as much from the CNN moderated questions (or lack thereof) as you can from the answers from the candidates. We might, for instance, scold CNN for the lack of framework to really discuss the urgency of climate change (Anderson Cooper: “we will get to climate change and environmental issues later . . .”). If it weren’t for Bernie Sanders, I’m not sure when the debate would have turned to ecology at all. )

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how long has big oil believed in climate change?

As the Union of Concerned Scientists unveiled in their July 2015 report, The Climate Deception Dossiers, Exxon internally recognized climate change as fact in 1981– right before they went on to spent $30 million on research that would support climate change denial. Are we surprised? No. Is it important? Yes. Read more at The Leap.

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how pope francis is reviving radical economics

Excerpt from: How Pope Francis is Reviving Radical Catholic Economics- Some Catholics have been quietly practicing them all along.

By Nathan Schneider

September 9, 2015

My friend Ryan Patrico, a doctoral
student in history at Yale, noticed something curious while studying the German nuns whose convents wound up in Protestant regions in the early, bloody days of the Reformation. He focused on those nuns who refused the option of relocating to Catholic areas where they could practice their faith more freely. They understood their vows as being not only to certain kinds of prayers and allegiance to a pope, but to stewarding a certain plot of land and shepherding the surrounding economy. “Their Catholicism bound them to a place,” Patrico writes. They felt their salvation was tied up with caring for the land.

These nuns are a reminder that Pope Francis isn’t coming out of nowhere with his often perplexing “small is beautiful” form of ecological economics. He calls for urgency in confronting the climate crisis, while declining to put his trust in modern technology and markets for the solution. His sources of inspiration are seemingly lost causes: the remaining vestiges of indigenous agriculture, cooperative business models, and a call for the mass rejection of consumerism.

To read more, Click Here!

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corroding our democracy (big oil, the canadian government, and the silencing of environmental science)

Democracy Now on the (nearly) unbelievable story of they extent to which Canada’s oil industry has stifled the country’s democracy, silenced its scientists, and crippled its environmentalist movements. It is bananas, and it is worse than you would have imagined.

“Well first of all, the government has shut down the majority of scientific research in the country that had to do with climate change. This is a government in denial […] They fired hundreds of scientists, and the ones that are left are being told that they can’t release their research to us, even though it’s tax-funded research. They are also being told that they can’t talk to the press unless they have to have a handler and it’s an approved interview. They have to have a handler from the prime minister’s office. So the scientists I’ve talked to, they’re embarrassed; they’re frustrated; they’re protesting. Last week in Canada we had thousands of scientists hit the streets in their lab coats protesting the federal government because they can’t speak. They’re being muzzled.”


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