the irresistible fleet of bicycles

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cobia: it’s for dinner?


We are pretty glad to tell you that we dug up this article from the April 2014 issue of National Geographic on a “pioneering” fish farmer in Panama. “The Other White Meat” follows Brian O’Hanlon, who’s working to make Cobia, a little-known species native to mid-atlantic and indo-pacific waters, a challenger to the dinner paradigm of salmon and sea bass. Why? They say it may be cheaper, more environmentally-friendly, and humane to produce.

“O’Hanlon’s farm, which is part of a company he founded called Open Blue, wants to buck 4,000 years of human innovation and farm fish back in the ocean. He says that raising an animal in its natural habitat means it will be healthier and taste better and, with the right technology, grow far more efficiently. Some have said he’s pioneering a new form of aquaculture. O’Hanlon is on his way to shipping 250 tons of fish each month, a respectable haul for a midsize company under ten years old. Every few days, planes take what once swam in his underwater cages off to Asia, Europe, and North America. He started the operation in Panama in 2009, and last year, for the first time, demand exceeded supply.”

Read more on the National Geographic website.

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call for applicants: farmer in residence


URBY is seeking to hire a Farmer in Residence for a unique Urban Farm nested within a new, 600-unit rental complex on the North Shore of Staten Island.  This is a one-of-a-kind position for a seasoned grower who is also an educator and entrepreneur.  The farm will serve the on-site cafe, market, and residents’ CSA.  The Farmer in Residence will receive competitive compensation (based on experience), including placement in a studio apartment on-site beginning in Spring 2016. For more information or to fill out an application, click here.

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visit sev on an island this feb!


Summit Dates: February 11-13, 2016
Summit Location: Friday Harbor, San Juan Island

The San Juan Islands Agricultural Summit is back in 2016!  Returning to Friday Harbor, it will take place on Friday and Saturday, February 11-13th.  Join fellow farmers, regional experts, local food and farm advocates for two days of education, inspiration, and camaraderie.

Keynote speakers for 2016 will include Severine von Tscharner-Fleming, a farmer, activist, and organizer based in the Champlain Valley of New York.  She is founder and director of The Greenhorns, a grassroots cultural organization with the mission to promote, recruit and support a growing movement of young farmers and ranchers in America. She also co-founded the National Young Farmers Coalition, the Agrarian Trust, and Maine Sail Freight. She is a director of the Schumacher Center for New Economics.

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In case your family/ friends want to go on a trip… with food first!


Our Tours

Food Sovereignty Tours offer you an opportunity to travel to international destinations to experience local food systems and the food sovereignty movement first-hand. Through one- to two-week educational tours, you will learn how you are connected to the global food system and acquire knowledge and strategies you can use to create just, sustainable and healthy food systems in your own community. On each tour, local hosts provide an overview of their country’s history, culture, politics, ecology and agriculture. We also meet with specialists to provide background on specific topics relating to the tour’s theme. With a firm commitment to sustainability and justice, Food Sovereignty Tours connects you to the farmers, consumers, activists, NGOs, policy-makers and experts working to transform the global food system. Check out our FAQ for additional information. In addition to the public tours listed below, we also offer private tours for your group of 8 or more.

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sewing the seeds of syria: farming group rescues plant species threatened by war

The Experimental Farm Network seeks to preserve the world’s biodiversity one seed at a time. The best case for a plant’s survival is for people to grow it widely.

Lettuce seeds

Taylor is part of the Experimental Farm Network, a New Jersey-based group that connects farmers and gardeners to exchange rare and threatened varieties of plants, including those from a Syria upended by war. The network is concerned with plummeting biodiversity, and encourages collaborators to develop new types of fruits and vegetables in a kind of democratization of rare genetic material.

This year, he became especially interested in Syrian seeds. Most of us don’t think about agriculture as one of the losses of war. We think of the loss of human life, the rubbled cities and the looted archaeological sites.

But agriculture, too, is an ancient heritage that can be vulnerable. In Syria, some farmers cannot access the seeds they need, fertilizer or irrigation, according to several Syrian agricultural experts and a July report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

To read more of this article from the Guardian, CLICK HERE!

To donate to their IndieGogo campaign, click HERE


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