the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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trade, commons, seedstock and revolutionary politics

WEDNESDAY September 2nd
6pm- 8.30 pm
Boylston Hall 105 in Harvard Yard.
FREE and OPEN to the public
We hope you can join for this event presented by Greenhorns’ Maine Sail Freight  in collaboration with “Food Better” at Harvard University.

Join Brian Donahue, Marguerita Desy and John Forti for an evening panel and facilitated public discussion to bring these questions to the fore- ground. The Greenhorns’ Maine Sail Freight project, delivering Maine-grown cargo to Boston’s Long Wharf on August 30th prolongs our public- performance logistics with a series of public conversations. We’ll be at Boston Public Market the whole month of September, and over the winter will start back up with public programs in Maine.

The young farmers movement shares a bold vision, to rebuild a more regional, more sustainable, more resilient food economy. Individual farms and farmers are actors, but we know that coordinating across bigger distances and confronting the structural and economic barriers will require serious teamwork. Our boat-stunt, doing more than $70,000 in regional trade,  is intended to bring into the open some of these larger systems- coordination questions. We Greenhorns want to get guidance from our elders, and lessons from history about how trade evolves, and how systems evolve, and how we should be preparing ourselves for the work ahead.  This panel is mostly about the history of trade in this country, as a way to inform our approach to the re-design of trade-systems.
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learn more about the schooner adventure!

The Greenhorns announce a last minute vessel change for the Maine Sail Freight  maiden voyage from Maine to Boston. We will be sailing, and selling as scheduled, thanks to the alacrity and fluid logistical finesse of Captain Stefan Edick and the Schooner Adventure. We are ocean legal and on our way to BOSTON HARBOR. Many thanks to the nautical architects, marina stewards and coast guard officials animated the prospect of Adventure-based commerce. It takes a team to hoist this sail!
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The Gloucester Adventure, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit maritime historic preservation and educational organization. We are the stewards of the 1926 dory-fishing Schooner Adventure. Our mission begins with restoration and preservation in perpetuity of the National Historic Landmark Schooner Adventure, one of the last surviving Grand Banks dory-fishing schooners. The Schooner Adventure is a national treasure that has resumed active sailing as an icon of the American fisheries and as a floating classroom for maritime history and environmental education programs. The Schooner will be operated at sea, primarily along the New England coast, as a living monument to Massachusetts’€™ fishing heritage. As such, the Schooner Adventure is important not only to Gloucester, but also to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and all America.

Our goal is to heighten awareness of Gloucester’€™s role in the development of the American Fishing Industry, the plight of the thousands of men lost at sea, and how a fleet of fast and able schooners defined a regional economy.

ADVENTURE HISTORY:

The Schooner Adventure was designed by famous marine architect Thomas McManus as a “knockabout”. The schooner was built in 1926 in Essex, Massachusetts by the John F. James and Son Shipyard. From 1926 – 1953 Schooner Adventure fished cod, haddock and halibut from Nantucket to Newfoundland, along the Grand Banks of the North Atlantic. Carrying a sailing rig, diesel engine, and 14 dories, Adventure was an exceptionally fast and able vessel, the ultimate evolution of the fishing schooner. When retired in 1953, Schooner Adventure was the last American dory fishing trawler left in the Atlantic. In 1954, Schooner Adventure was retired from fishing and converted into a windjammer for passenger cruising, removing the engine, propeller, and prop shaft. Adventure carried passengers along the coast of Maine until 1987. Her grace, beauty, and prowess as a sailing vessel earned her the nickname “Queen of the Windjammers.”

Adventure was then donated to the people of Gloucester, Massachusetts by way of The Gloucester Adventure Inc., a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization formed to be steward of this historic vessel. The organization’€™s mission is three-fold:

  1. Restore and preserve Adventure in perpetuity,
  2. Utilize Adventure as an educational resource with programming for maritime, environmental and cultural issues and,
  3. Sail Adventure as a symbol of Gloucester’s maritime heritage.

For more information: http://www.schooner-adventure.org

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The mission of the Maine Sail Freight project is to enliven public conversation about the logistics of regional trade, to draw on our long, storied maritime history as a basis for a long-view conversation about shifting our farm economy for the future. There is an economic action at the middle of this project, attended by pageantry and panel discussions, we invite the public to get involved directly, carry some cargo, and discuss tactics for re-regionalizing our farm economy.


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new hampshire: sev speaks THIS FRIDAY in seacoast region

Sustainable farmer at Amos Fortune Friday

IMG_3114The Amos Fortune Forum will welcome their sixth speaker on Friday night. Noted “new farming” expert and Agrarian Severine Fleming will deliver a talk entitled, “A New Economy on the Land.”

Severine is a farmer, activist, and organizer based in the Champlain Valley of New York. She is founder and director of The Greenhorns, a grassroots cultural organization with the mission to promote, recruit and support a growing movement of young farmers and ranchers in America.

The entering generation of Agrarians has demonstrated a bold vision to build thousands of farm businesses for local food security. We need many more to succeed. Many who try are confounded when they try to find durable land access and tenure. Severine argues that we need to design and enact new frameworks for community land-ownership. All of us benefit from the revival of these farm-steads, and the initiatives of young farmers, orchardists, and dairymen and women. Today, the macro-economy imposes extraction, speculation and degradation of our land, but that will not work tomorrow. How can our watershed, our food-shed, and the historic cultural landscape inform the new economy we need? How can eaters reconnect meaningfully with both the eco-system and economic system that will sustain the quality of the places we love?

The Amos Fortune Forum is presented at the Old Meetinghouse in historic Jaffrey Center, New Hampshire, approximately 2.5 miles west of Downtown Jaffrey. Speakers are presented at 8 p.m. sharp each Friday during the summer. As is the custom of the Forum, no admission is charged, however, donations are accepted. After each forum, a brief reception is held with each speaker at The First Church in Jaffrey Parish Hall, directly across from the Old Meetinghouse. Information for the Forum can be found at www.amosfortune.com, Facebook (facebook.com/amosfortuneforum) or at Twitter (@amosforum). The telephone number is (641) 715-3900. ext. 742251.


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from maine to boston by ship: a local economy stunt by young farmers with a long view

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THIS MONTH! The GREENHORNS’ MAINE SAIL FREIGHT will sail 11 tons of Maine-grown cargo from Maine to Boston aboard the beloved 131 foot traditional wooden schooner, Harvey Gammage. We will load cargo on August 23rd at Waterman’s  Community  Center at North Haven’s Fox Islands thoroughfare. The majority of cargo, 10 more tons, will come aboard on August 27th in Portland Harbor.

The  approximately  $70,000  worth  of  cargo,  packaged in traditional  boxes, will sail down the coast to Boston Harbor, where it will be celebrated and unloaded from the hold on August 30th at the Long Wharf (next to the Boston aquarium)! Then transported by a fleet of cherry red trailer bicycles to Boston public markets and other locations. The cargo will be pre-sold online, and also available for passers-by for purchase dockside. It comes in a few different size collections, from little canvas bundles to large wooden barrels. BUY MAINE SAIL FREIGHT GOODS NOW!

All events are free and open to the public! Please join us! Also, check out this great article about Maine Sail Freight in the Portland Press Herald.


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maine sail freight revives a salty history of revolution & independence

Greenhorns press! 

In this new millennium marked by the looming threat of transnational trade deals like the Transpacific Partnership (TPP), The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA), one unusual trade adventure, Maine Sail Freight will embark on a creative, bold journey as an act of defiance against business-as-usual.  When Maine Sail Freight launches its maiden voyage at the end of August carrying 11 tons of local, Maine-made cargo, the Greenhorns – a plucky band of young farmers – and the sailing crew of an historic wooden schooner are declaring their independence from corporate tyranny and re-invigorating sail freight as a wind-powered transportation agent of the booming local food economy.

And, interestingly, they will carry one freight item that has a long history of revolutionary potential: salt.

Yes, salt.

Over a hundred years before Gandhi’s independence movement kicked the British Empire out of India, the American colonies were roundly beating the same empire using tools of nonviolent action – noncooperation, civil disobedience, boycotts, strikes, blockades, parallel governments, marches, rallies, and self-reliance programs. The two independence movements even shared parallel salt campaigns.

Both the American Revolution and the India Self-Rule movement used salt as a tool of resistance and liberation. Gandhi’s 1930 Salt Satyagraha campaign is famous. The 1776 New England saltworks expansion is virtually unknown. Indeed, the well-organized, clearly identifiable nonviolent campaigns are often overshadowed by violence and war in the retelling of revolutionary era history. The research, however, testifies to the nonviolent campaigns pivotal role in the struggle.

Know your history, as the saying goes. The British certainly should have. In 1930, one hundred and fifty years after American Independence, Lord Irwin, Viceroy of India, commented on the brewing salt law resistance saying, ” At present the prospect of a salt campaign does not keep me awake at night.” Too bad . . . if he had stayed awake, studying the history of salt, colonial governments, and independence movements, he might have lost sleep . . . but he wouldn’t have lost India.
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maine-made farm goods sailing soon

Maine-made farm goods soon will wind their way to Boston by schooner

It’s art. It’s protest. It’s celebration. And, who knows? It may even be a practical way to get cargo to market.

When the wooden two-masted schooner Harvey Gamage sets sail from Portland in late August, laden with Maine farm products destined for Boston markets and restaurants, it will probably look like a historical re-enactment to those watching from shore.

But to Severine von Tscharner Fleming, it is so much more. It is performance art at sea. It is an economic experiment. It is a bridge between generations. It is both a protest of the failings of the global food system and a celebration of Maine’s regional food economy.

“We don’t need a logarithm of some venture capital-funded technology company to help us do the logistics of selling our food to Boston,” Fleming said. “We can do it with clipboards. We can do it with sailboats.”

Fleming is a community organizer working on the maiden voyage of the Maine Sail Freight project, a summer-long spectacle that will blend social media and “sailor’s gossip,” vinyl records and sea shanties, computers and cargo logs. Many pre-sail events and “side stunts” have already been held this summer to bring attention to the project, including a “teach-in,” picnic and concert in Portland last week. Still to come are a working shipyard dinner in Portland and a parade of traditional Norse wooden boats down the Kennebec River.

Sponsored by Greenhorns…. Click HERE to read more!


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TTIP and tall ships afterparty! july 20th, portland maine!

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TALL SHIPS AFTERPARTY and TTIIP TEACH IN!
4 live bands!
Hot stuff 
5pm– late
Come on out!
On July 20th,we’ve got a full afternoon and evening TALL SHIPS AFTERPARTY and TTIP teach in at Thompson’s Point in Portland Maine.  We’ve invited our favorite agrarian bands, including The Parlor, Will Dailey  and Milk and Honey Rebellion– as well as sea shanty singer Paul Hartney. It’s a stop-over event for Neil Young’s Monsanto Year’s tour— so we’ll have a full complement of organic agriculture activists in attendance, and perhaps a special guest or two. The focus of the training is on ‘terms of trade’ with a training by Food and Water watch regional director  Alex Beauchamps  and Maine Fair Trade and the Citizen Policy Commission about the impact of the TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, a free trade agreement) on New England agriculture.  Come early, stay late– tall ships forever!
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