the irresistible fleet of bicycles

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can costal urbanization happen without landscape architects?

A 2013 Lecture by Pierre Belanger at TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture, Chair of Landscape Architecture within lecture series “How Do You Landscape?”

Starting with the claim that Americans are “geographically illiterate,” Belanger explores the concept of urbanity, especially as it relates to our landscape infrastructure, and you probably haven’t heard anyone speak about urbanization with more nuance or innovative thought. The Harvard professor argues that not only is our land surface urbanized, but so are the ground deep beneath our feet, the air far above us, and most of the bodies of water along our shores. As these processes proliferate, Belanger argues for viewing “urbanity” within a more holistic context. Where do materials that build our cities come from? Where do our wastes go? How does development on land radically alter landscapes under the sea?

“Rather than trying to see the processes of changing climates, we need to essentially work with them. Because right now rather thinking of our urbanizations on coasts as downstream from all these larger inland processes, we should think of them as being upstream of this larger oceanic landscape that we are essentially urbanizing.”

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keeping orchards alive and well

Check out the rad folks at the Urban Orchard Project, based out of the UK. They are an organization devoted to creating, restoring, and celebrating fruıt orchards in London and beyond. The video above provides a quick lesson on pruning old fruıit trees, and they provide more invaluable advice on their webpage.

Remnant Orchards, or what remains of traditional orchards, are valuable and often overlooked resources. They often have high genetic and bio diversity; can serve as food sources to urban populations; foster local character; and help make city spaces more pleasurable to inhabit. The Urban Orchard Project works wıth communities and activists to restore the health of these orchards by extending the life of old trees while newly-planted trees become established. This has the compound effect of providing continuous and long-lasting habitat for wildlife and producing food for human consumption.

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casting call for city women turning towards the farming life

Orion Entertainment
Cole Huling, a casting producer for Orion Entertainment, is currently working on a new TV series that features women who are leaving behind the city/suburban life to become farmers/ranchers/etc., working the land and raising animals. They are looking for women who have recently moved to a farm as well as women who are preparing to move.
 Women with a sense of adventure, lots of energy, and a great story to tell are encouraged to get in contact!
Contact details:
Cole Huling
Casting Producer 
Orion Entertainment

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urban farmers in the northlands

Our friends at Stone’s Throw Urban Farm need your support on Kickstarter!

Stone’s Throw Urban farm is a new vegetable operation formed through the collaboration of three urban farms in the Twin Cities. We transform vacant lots into micro-farms, and run a diversified rotation on about 18 lots around the city. We’re taking on new land this year, with the goal of feeding more people in our community and working towards paying ourselves a living wage. We will be running a 100-member vegetable CSA, selling at the Mill City Market in downtown Minneapolis, and hopefully selling directly to our neighbors.

With the new land we’re turning over this spring, we need help covering some start-up costs. We’re raising money through Kickstarter, and any amount you can give will help us feed our neighbors and grow our own livelihoods as urban farmers. We strive to be a model for urban food production across the country, and hope we can give back to this community of Greenhorns in that way.

Thanks a million for your support!

Emily and the STUF farmers

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des moines green up!

some great workshops on urban farming this weekend if you’re in the area.


Des Moines – Friday, 6/11, 3-6pm

Waterloo – Saturday, 6/12, 9am-12noon,

Cedar Rapids – Saturday, 6/12, 2-5pm

Marshalltown – Sunday, 6/13, 11am-2pm

Call or email for exact locations

COST: Free – space is limited, so please RSVP to reserve your spot!

WHAT: Andy Pressman, a sustainable agriculture specialist for the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) office in Shavertown, Penn., will tour Iowa, discussing how community gardens help spur neighborhood interaction and development, transform weed-covered lots into green space, and conserve resources. The half-day workshops in Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Marshalltown and Waterloo, which are free and open to the public, will include a presentation on topics ranging from micro-enterprise and marketing to soil remediation, composting, and small plot tool usage.

CONTACT: Hannah Lewis, National Center for Appropriate Technology,, 877-327-6379 (toll free) or 515-288-0460.

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the foodprint project

Foodprint NYC is the first in a series of international conversations about food and the city. From a cluster analysis of bodega inventories to the cultural impact of the ice-box, and from food deserts to peak phosphorus, panelists will examine the hidden corsetry that gives shape to urban foodscapes, and collaboratively speculate on how to feed New York in the future. The free afternoon program will include designers, policy-makers, flavor scientists, culinary historians, food retailers, and others, for a wide-ranging discussion of New York’s food systems, past and present, as well as opportunities to transform our edible landscape through technology, architecture, legislation, and education.

Date: Saturday, February 27
1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Studio-X (180 Varick St., Suite 1610, New York, NY 10014)
Free and open to the public

More info HERE

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little city gardens

Our talented and tireless artist, Brooke Budner, and her business partner Caitlyn Galloway, run a project called Little City Gardens.  Check  their website/blog.

What is Little City Gardens?
It is a small urban farm in San Francisco, and it is an experiment in the economic viability of small-scale urban market-gardening.

We have been working steadily for a year towards our aims: to craft a way for urban food production to sustain us economically, to build community through innovative, collaborative local food systems, and thus to help establish the path of ‘urban farmer’ as a career. We are motivated by the belief that urban farming should be a common livelihood in the United States as it has been, and still is, in some other countries. Through this project we are actively wondering: what does it take to make this happen? Continue reading


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