the irresistible fleet of bicycles


1 Comment

research highlight: removing non-crop habitat does not increase food safety

b45ac7dd01d50a36dab25fe53c4647ce

Schematic of farm environment using co-management approach for food safety and environment.

In 2006, a deadly Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak in bagged spinach was traced to California’s Central Coast region, where >70% of the salad vegetables sold in the United States are produced. Although no definitive cause for the outbreak could be determined, wildlife was implicated as a disease vector. Growers were subsequently pressured to minimize the intrusion of wildlife onto their farm fields by removing surrounding non-crop vegetation. How vegetation removal actually affects foodborne pathogens was unknown. Researchers at UC Berkeley (including Daniel Karp and Claire Kremen of BFI‘s Center for Diversified Farming Systems), UC Davis, the Nature Conservancy, and the Natural Capital Project found that removal of non-crop vegetation did not in fact reduce incidences of enterohemorrhagic E. coli(EHEC). The study actually found a slight but significant increase in pathogen prevalence where non-crop vegetation had been removed, calling into question reforms that promote vegetation removal to improve food safety.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

RSVP now: northeast gathering on domestic fair trade, august 14 in amherst, ma

ATTN:: Open Meeting: Northeast Gathering on Domestic Fair Trade
Friday August 14, 2015 9:00 am-12:30pm
Campus Center 903 UMASS, Amherst

This Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Summer Conference Free Meeting, sponsored by The Domestic Fair Trade Committee of NOFA’s Interstate Council’s (IC) Policy Committee, invites activists from the Northeast Region who are engaged in projects and organizing efforts that come under the broad heading of Domestic Fair Trade to come together to share their work and ideas and to discuss possible collaboration for the immediate future.

Who should come? Farm workers, farmers, food system workers, processors, manufacturers, worker organizers, farmer organizers, cooperative organizers, visionaries, and allies.

Consider attending if your work (paid or volunteer) involves fairer wages, safer work, Continue reading


Leave a comment

a+ technology (adaptive, accessible, appropriate)

Examples of Questionable Applications of Technology:

  1. using garden sheers to trim your bangs
  2. building a forest fire to barbecue burgers for two
  3. mincing garlic with a machete
  4. driving a ton of steel to transport a 150 lbs human body across town
  5. relying on expensive, petroleum-reliant, highly-commodified tools to support innovative, unconventional, and ecologically-sound small farms

 

This week in the Food List, the focus is on Appropriate Technology— or, in other words, technology that suits its purposes (in scale, cost, application, etc.). The presented case studies presented prove that when it comes to sustainable, small-scale farming, bigger is not better and one size doesn’t necessarily fit all.

Continue reading


1 Comment

the land portal

Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 9.22.47 PM

There is a wealth of information and data online about land governance. However, much of this content is fragmented and difficult to locate, and often it is not openly licensed to enable wide dissemination and reuse. Grassroots knowledge may be particularly hard to find, or may not be available online, and the data and information available is often not presented in ways that are accessible to grassroots communities, media and organizations. Bringing this information together in one place through the Land Portal, actively addressing gaps in the available information, and providing a range of ways for the information to be accessed and shared will increase the use and usefulness of the available information.

This will support more informed debates and policy making, and greater adoption and up scaling of best practices and promising innovations, leading to improve land governance practice. Through a focus on localization of content creation and use, the Land Portal will contribute to the cultivation of information and creation of interfaces and tools that help tip the balance of power towards the most marginalized and insecure, promoting greater social justice in land tenure practices.

The Portal allows for the collection, sourcing, and searching of otherwise fragmented and inaccessible data and information on land governance and land use from diverse sources, produced by governments, academia, international organizations, indigenous peoples and NGOs. Besides documenting land rights, the Portal also encourages social information exchange, debate and networking.


Leave a comment

apply to the community seed resource program!

The Community Seed Resource Program (CSRP) provides tools and guidance to community groups interested in creating seed-focused events, exchanges, libraries and gardens. It is a collaboration between Seed Matters and Seed Savers Exchange to support community seed initiatives and empower community organizing around sustainable seed.

The CSRP offers three resources to empower community organizing around sustainable seed:

community seed toolkits, including seeds, educational resources, and seed saving supplies.
  -access to SSE’s national seed exchange
mentorship

The CSRP focuses on legitimizing three key initiatives of community seed – seed swaps, community seed banks, and seed gardens – so community groups can weave seed into their efforts with success.

Community seed projects revive a tradition we’ve shared in growing food for centuries: from a handful of seed, we grow, gather, and share more seeds – enough not only for ourselves but an abundance to pass on to neighbors, family, and the next generation of gardeners and farmers. Saving and exchanging seeds is the way we discover new varieties, preserve heirlooms, and breed locally adapted varieties.

Whether you are a beginner seed saver or long-time organizer of seed projects, our resources can guide you through the decisions it takes to develop projects that fit the needs of your community. Click HERE to learn more and apply!


Leave a comment

shaka movement

You want to check this out. Shaka Movement.org
A model for addressing the GMO issue.

shaka

The SHAKA Movement is an advocacy, communications and educational outreach program and hub, where people and organizations come together to work in unison toward sustainable practices to affect a positive change for the environment and for the people of the Hawaiian Islands.

We are a self-organizing grassroots movement, which means that each of US who participates, IS the movement.

The goal of this website is to educate and organize citizens. We provide the best information available and give all citizens the opportunity to participate in affecting change in a way that best suits their life, their passion and their time availability. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 686 other followers