the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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open source mapping through ny public library

Index

The Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division is very proud to announce the release of more than 20,000 cartographic works as high resolution downloads. We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions.* To the extent that some jurisdictions grant NYPL an additional copyright in the digital reproductions of these maps, NYPL is distributing these images under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. The maps can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page, and downloaded (!), through the Map Warper. First, create an account, then click a map title and go. Here’s a primer and more extended blog post on the warper.

To read more, click HERE!


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maps showing how maine’s coastline could change

New sea-level rise forecast is alarming: Here are 10 maps showing how Maine’s coastline could change

backcove_west

This computer-generated image shows what Portland’s Back Cove would look like after a rise in sea level (Natural Resources Council of Maine).

According to a report this week in Slate, a team led by the former lead NASA scientist on climate change is now forecasting a much more rapid and dramatic rise in sea level than was previously expected.

Continue reading


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sunday reading: foodland from tni

image via thenewinquiry.com

Check out The New Inquiry Adam Rothstein’s 2012 interview with Nicola Twilley, who works for Columbia University’s Studio-X, is co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and runs the Edible Grography blog. They discuss food piracy, refrigeration geography, and strategic food reserves.

Adam Rothstein: How would you describe the Edible Geography blog project?

Nicola Twilley: I had too many diverse interests in food space, culture, naturally built and virtual landscapes, and environmental issues. Rather than having a website where I write about everything that I find interesting, I force myself to go through the lens of food.

I initially resisted launching a “food blog,” because of the image of a food blog being just “pictures of cupcakes” or “what I had for lunch,” or “ten exciting new ways to prepare quinoa.” But I think of it as a frame, frequently on an entirely different perspective to a story that I might otherwise miss. It relates to stories of domestication in agriculture, bioarchaeology, culture, technology, and almost anything else. There’s not a lot of stuff you can’t address through the lens of food, so although I call it a constraint, it hardly is at all.

CONTINUE READING


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do you live in one of california’s pesticide hotspots?

image via theguardian.com

You might wonder how much of your food and air is contaminated by pesticides. Now, if you live in California, you can find out!

The Center for Investigative Reporting has put together an interactive map of California’s pesticide hotspots so you can check whether or not you live in one.

Check out the interactive map HERE.


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new plant hardiness zone map!

Check it out, Greenhorns: 2012 Plant Hardiness Zone Map 
You can type in your zipcode or click on any state for a detailed map.  So user friendly!

The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree F zones. Compared to the 1990 version, zone boundaries in this edition of the map have shifted in many areas. The new map is generally one 5-degree Fahrenheit half-zone warmer than the previous map throughout much of the United States.

For the first time, the map is available as an interactive GIS-based map, for which a broadband Internet connection is recommended, and as static images for those with slower Internet access. Users may also simply type in a ZIP Code and find the hardiness zone for that area.


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10 years of california farmlink

Technically, if they were farmers, they would no longer qualify under the USDA’s definition of “Beginning Farmer.”

anyway… check them out.  And their snazzy new map of farm opportunities!

On August 30, 2009, California FarmLink and over 100 of its friends, farmers, funders, and new acquaintances wiled away the afternoon at Oak Hill Farm in Glen Ellen, CA, celebrating ten years of working to keep land in agriculture and farmers on that land. Continue reading