the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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the seed we need: there’s not enough

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Outside right now, in central Massachusetts, it’s 5 degrees Fahrenheit. There’s a thin crust of fresh snow on the ground, and the trees are brown and bare. But in the flood of seed catalogues that have been flowing into the farmhouse mailbox over the past few months, it’s summer. Peas are fat in the pod, the lettuce is in full flush, and eggplants hang heavy, shiny, and purple. All the grass is green. There are flowers everywhere.

It’s into this imagination land of color and warmth that we’ve been burrowing throughout the coldest season as we attempt to tease out a concrete organic crop plan from this fantasy of perfect bounty. But as with any fantasy, there are limitations to this one’s ability to deliver on it’s promise: our land is not perfect land, our soils are not perfect soils, we are not perfect growers, and the weather, inevitably, will not behave perfectly for our purposes.

Even more than the obvious disparities, however, these catalogues are limited in that they bely the true nature of their industry. Abundance, diversity, and choice: this is what we hope to achieve in the crop plan for this farm’s organic vegetable CSA, and that is what the seed catalogues are selling us. But the reality of the seed industry is not that. The reality of the seed industry is this:

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Consolidation is the name of the game when it comes to seed, and nothing suppresses abundant diversity and choice like the concentration of research funding and intellectual property rights into the hands of just a few. Despite the existence of a select number of seed companies that cater to the needs of small-scale, diversified, and/or organic farmers, and despite the considerable (and still growing) market for organic seed, the actual supply of attainable organic genetics is quite small. And without sufficient organic seed, the hardiness of organic agriculture starts to look—well, considerably less hardy.

According to the Organic Seed Alliance’s 2016 report, most organic farmers still rely on conventional seed because they can’t find organic versions of the varieties they need […] The result for farmers is not simply compromised principles and reliance on regulatory exemptions, but a reservoir of organic germplasm whose quality, in addition to scale, is inadequate to their needs.

The reasoning here is partly ideological, partly regulatory, and partly (the biggest part) due to the nature of seed, explains Tyson Neukirch, former head grower at the Farm School. Growing with organic seed means supporting the growth of the organic seed industry—an act of solidarity as well as self-interest. Increased demand ought to lead to increased supply of organic seed, and increased supply enables organic farmers to better comply with organic certifiers who are becoming more stringent with their requirement that organic-certified farmers use organic seed unless, as the USDA National Organic Program puts it, “an equivalent organically produced variety is not commercially available.”

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nofa-ny farm hack event

Scaling Up the Beginning Farm with Innovation and Appropriate Technology

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July 9, 2013, 3:30 -6:00pm followed by potluck dinner
Juniper Hill Farm, 82 Loukes Lane, Wadhams(Westport) NY 12993

On-farm equipment hacks and energy efficiency are effective strategies to increase output and scale up the farm, but how does the smart farmer prioritize projects and maintain a low cost for making such improvements?  At Juniper Hill Farm, the answer has been a mixture of DIY ingenuity to hone just the right infrastructure and tools, along with taking advantage of incentives and grants to implement the costlier infrastructure needed to run the farm well.

More event details HERE
Farm Hack forum HERE


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going to NOFA-NY this weekend?

Stop by the Farm Hack booth!
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Farm Hack and NYFC are hosting a farm innovation exhibition Saturday and Sunday of the conference.  We will be there with some sweet hacks, so don’t forget to swing by and chat with us. Bring hacks of your own, if you’ve got them! Find us by the pre-registration section, we will have our big banner, and the Culticycle. Oh yes.


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time to apply for winter conference scholarships!

These folks have funded 25 scholarships for  young and beginning farmers from the Hudson Valley for the NOFA-NY conference in January. Most conferences offer scholarships – do your research!

We’re busily preparing for the 2013 Winter Conference, which will again take place at the Saratoga Hilton City Center from January 25-27.  The theme for this year’s conference will be Resilience.

Please note that we are well into planning our workshops at this point in the year.  We maintain an online form for all workshop and field day suggestions, so please don’t hesitate to make a proposal for a future event (though inclusion in the 2013 Winter Conference is no longer likely).

Scholarship information is posted at www.nofany.org/events/2013scholarships.