the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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come a long way baby: new film on the evolution of organic

Peppered with priceless footage of the origins of the organic movement, this film delves head-first into where we came from and where we’re going. Our favorite quote from the trailer?  “Organic can get better.” Spoiler alert: the Greenhorns are in this film. Fund them here!


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greenhorns releases: MANIFESTA!

We are so proud of this awesome collaboration. If you’ve been wondering how a maritime art stunt fits into the mission of an organization that supports farmers (I mean, talk about your landlubbers!), this publication is for you! Manifesta lays out the story, history, discourse, and activism behind the Maine Sail Freight project last summer! The un-monograph is a fun and galvanizing read, and we think it is going to make a real believer out of you!

This is a story about a group of young farmers staging a pageant-like protest about the terms of trade in our agricultural economy, and the nature of transportation and exchange within that model.

It’s an elaborate stunt, invoking colonial history and the maritime ex- traction economy of coastal Maine as a platform for discourse on a more regional, more prosperous, and more diverse food economy for the future.

We claim the ocean as an ally and a commons—a venue to imagine what a world where 60% of the retail price goes to the farmer, and view- point from which to watch the farmers of the region operate, and co-oper- ate to circulate wealth and add value. We raise a flag for food sovereignty on the mast of our sail boat.

We are not content to labor where 70% of the agricultural work is performed by those without citizenship. We are not content to operate
in a high-volume, low-value commodity extraction economy. We are not content to be silent while our nation negotiates yet more free trade agree- ments freeing only those at the top of the capitalist slag heap and chaining the rest of us to their terms.

This project is our retort!


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documented agricultural history from 1935-1944

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Get ready to be looking at a lot of very amazing old photos on an interactive map…

From 1935-1944, the Farm Security Administration-Office of War Information undertook the largest photography project ever sponsored by the federal government. After a series of setbacks in the courts that repealed many of the First New Deal’s program, President Roosevelt pursued a new set of initiatives including the Resettlement Administration in 1935.

In order to build support for and justify government programs, the Historical Section set out to document America, often at her most vulnerable, and the successful administration of relief service. The Farm Security Administration—Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) produced some of the most iconic images of the Great Depression and World War II. Unit photographers were sent across the country. The negatives were sent to Washington, DC. The growing collection came to be known as “The File.”

Read more and navigate your towns Ag history HERE.


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this history is worth knowing (for farmers, for everyone)

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American History, it’s not boring. (And it’s worth knowing.) Just ask J.L. Bell, a historian who writes on his well-curated blog about the start of the American Revolution in and around Boston.

How can we sell you on studying up on your American history? Well, we could give you the 3 a.m. infomercial-style pragmatic sales pitch, i.e.”Tired of being confused by the nightly news? Do you want a better understanding of today’s most prescient political arguments? Learn more about American’s aversion to taxation, the country’s long-standing tradition of underpaying agricultural workers, and the foundations of a long-entrenched and still-present racial, gender, and class-based hierarchy– and many more!”

Or, we could appeal to your competitive side. i.e. Trivia night!!!! VICTORY!!! It’s IN YOUR HAAANDS!!”

We could. But today I think we’ll try selling you sensationalist style, because colonial history of political dissent turns out to be far juicier than today’s petition-signing. i.e. Tune in to today’s American history on Boston 1775 for the ARSEN OF THE COURTHOUSE BY ANGRY MOB, the TARRING AND FEATHERING of public officials, and the HANGING OF THE TAXMAN EFFIGY. You won’t want to miss this!”

And really, I think you won’t.


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two chances to hear songs of maine by away down east this week

note: this is not actually the From Down East. This is the cover of a beautiful volume by William Blake (also comes highly recommended).

note: this is not actually the From Down East. This is the cover of a beautiful volume by William Blake (also comes highly recommended).

Can You Sing “Maine”?
Songs of Maine’s Fishermen, Sailors, Lumberjacks, River Drivers, & Shore Workers

featuring: From Away Downeast, America’s Easternmost Chantey Group will be playing the fiddle, guitar, banjo, and harmonica this week in Maine, and we highly recommend you make it one (if not both) of the shows. Singing along is strongly encouraged, and family members of all ages are welcome to attend.

First, they will performing Monday, August 17th at 7:00 p.m. at the Indian River Community Association at 1440 Indian River Road in Addison, ME. Admission to this event will be by donation to the building repair fund. For more information, email rick@snyderman-works.com or call 207-497-2450.

Then! On Wednesday, August 19th, Songs of Maine will continue with a FREE SHOW at the Pembroke Library on 221 Old County Road, Pembroke, ME, opposite the fair grounds and horse track. For more information on this show, call 207-726-4747, 726-4745, or email seasongs@207me.com


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history lesson – salvation army farm colonies

Around the turn of the century, the Salvation Army founded three intentional communities in Colorado, Ohio, and California in an effort to relieve urban farmcoloniespoverty that followed in the wake of rapid industrialization. Conceived by founder William Booth, the project was organized by his son-in-law Frederick Booth-Tucker, commander of the Salvation Army in the United States. Clark Spence’s account of this back-to-the-land experiment is at once agricultural, social, religious, and even political history enacted on both sides of the Atlantic: in the irrigated beet and alfalfa fields where small farmers fought hoppers, drought, or saline soil in an effort to wrest a living from their twenty acres; at the fund-raising meetings where the Booth-Tuckers garnered both applause and dollars from business leaders; and in the halls of Congress and Parliament where Army supporters argued in vain for government subsidies.

The Salvation Army Farm Colonies