the irresistible fleet of bicycles


Leave a comment

check out this amazing workshop on managing cattle, soil health, and local food economies in colorado.

11226771_659557294177782_1409123589_nThis workshop takes place on October 18th – 19th at Adams State University.  It is led by Dr. Allen Williams, a champion of the grass-fed beef industry as well as cutting edge grazing methodology. Dr. Williams helps restore natural soil water retention and reduce runoff, increase land productivity, enhance plant and wildlife biodiversity, and produce healthier food. In fact, he developed many of the original grass-fed protocols and technologies now adopted by the grass-fed sector.

This workshop focuses on the connection between cattle management and healthy soils as part of the local food economy. The Field Day on the second day focuses on details important to local cattle producers in managing and assessing their operations, maximizing quality, and ensuring soil and human health.

To see the full programme click HERE

To register, click HERE


Leave a comment

this badass lady runs a cattle company and writes wonderful essays

cattle_roundup_great_falls_mt_geo_b_bonnell_c1890

Every other Tuesday, High Country News‘s Laura Jean Schneider publishes a new essay on her experience as new cattle rancher in New Mexico. In her pieces, we’ve found the most compassionate and insightful commentary on the Malheur Occupation to date, well-articulated thoughts on “The Era of the Landless Agrarian,” and scores of compelling personal insights. Schneider and her husband are in the first year of managing their ranch, Triangle P Cattle Company.

Looking to catch up on the series?? Start right here with the first one.


Leave a comment

heritage grass discovered in wisconsin

EPSON DSC picture

A forgotten forage grass imported from Europe in the 1800s could soon begin to help boost cattle and dairy production in parts of the Upper Midwest. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Madison, Wisconsin, recently released the grass for commercial production.

The grass, named “Hidden Valley,” was discovered on a farmer’s shaded hilltop in a long-time pasture that had never been seeded with commercial forages. Cattle thrived on the grass, and it gradually spread from the hilltop into gullies and open areas. The farmer fed hay made from the grass to more cattle and spread the seeds in the manure. He also eventually began consulting with Michael Casler, a plant geneticist with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service(ARS).

Casler and his colleagues at the U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center spent more than a decade evaluating Hidden Valley, named for the farm where it was discovered. They found that cattle digest it more easily and eat more of it than other forages, thus gaining more weight when it’s available and producing more milk.

DNA tests show that the grass is a meadow fescue that has adapted to the Upper Mississippi River Basin since its arrival in the 1800s. It is drought tolerant and will survive freezing temperatures and repeated grazing. Surveys of the Upper Midwest “Driftless Region,” which includes parts of Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota, show that the grass can be found in a wide range of habitats. It also grows well on land taken out of crop production and allowed to revert to pasture.

To read more, click HERE!


Leave a comment

beef cattle improvement workshop, shondack landing, ny, sept. 18-19

Red_Devon_bull
BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT
With Gearld Fry and Mike Scannell
 Harrier Fields Farm
4116 County Route 21
Schodack Landing, NY
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., September 18-19, 2015
This workshop focuses on improving cattle herds with quality and quantity of meat per acre of grass. Learn how to recognize cattle that will yield 70% meat to bone and to reproduce it in your whole herd. And learn to recognize the bull that can make this happen. Learn about the importance of soil fertility and methods of achieving it.
Gearld Fry has a lifetime of experience earning his living from cattle to share. He has learned from the masters and brings along an exceptional gift in cattle detail. The last 20 years he has consulted world-wide, inspiring farmers and ranchers to improve their herds genetically.
Mike Scannell and Joan Harris have worked closely with Gearld for the last thirteen years. With Gearld’s guidance, we bought a small group of preindustrial phenotype females and bred them to Gearld’s pick of the best of the bulls in the world. We look forward to sharing our journey in breed/herd improvement. If you don’t understand improvement, degeneration is sure to follow.
The workshop runs from 9 to 4 each day, and lunch will be provided. Registration is $100.
Contact  (518) 732-7350 for more information and to register by September 8, 2015 or ASAP