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carbon farming workshop: sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation

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Carbon Poster 2.jpgBelieve it or not, there is some good news about climate change; agriculture, if done correctly can play a powerful role in removing carbon from the atmosphere where it is wreaking havoc. This can be done by taking carbon from the atmosphere and putting it into the soil where it has the power to increase fertility, hold water, and improve crop yields. Learn more at the one-day Carbon Farming workshop in October as part of the Marin Carbon Project.


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historic cover cropping

Do we like preaching to the choir? Sure do! Enter, this week’s installment from Kiss the Ground on using cover cropping for carbon sequestration. Now, can I get an Amen?!

This video features Jeff Borum, Soil Health Coordinator East Stanislaus Resource Conservation District , who mentions that some of the oldest records of cover cropping come from Virgil. Our interest piqued, we did a little digging to confirm this fact and unearthed some trivia about the history of cover cropping from this UC Davis article, but we know there’s more out there. Can anyone point us in the right direction??


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get regenerative: watch this inspiring keynote on no-till practices

Those of us lucky enough to be at the NOFA Mass Winter Conference this year were privileged to see Elizabeth and Paul Kaiser of Singing Frogs Farm in Sebastopol, CA give this Keynote speech. You’ve never seen no-till farming look this easy or this sensical. Skip to minute 27 to see my favorite part: 45 minutes of bed changeover condensed in a 45 second time lapse video.


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call for film submissions for change making tool-kits

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Real Food Films is calling for filmmakers to submit projects by April 1st that correspond to the themes of:

  • Crafting Public Policies for Public Health: Taking on Big Soda
  • Building Power with Food Workers
  • Tackling Climate Change Through Food

Selected films will be included in their 2017 Organizing Toolkits, which will be jam-packed with educational materials for groups and individuals interested in working in food system reform.


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carbon farming in los angeles

“It’s not humans that are damaging to ecosystems; it’s our extractive culture that is damaging to ecosystems.”

This week’s Kiss the Ground share features Rishi Kumar, founder of Sarvodaya Farms, on how we can use agriculture to repair ecosystems. Savordaya Farms is a one acre farm located inside the city limits of Los Angeles and provides the city’s only urban farmer training program.


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An Evening Gathering to Support
the 2nd Annual International
Soil Not Oil Conference
Thurs, July 21, 7:30pm, 2016 Free
At the Farmer & the Cook Restaurant
339 W El Roblar Dr, Ojai (Meiners Oak) CA 93023
Short films about Soil & Carbon Farming including
excerpts from The Seeds of Vandana Shiva documentary film

The solution to climate change & the solution to poverty are the same”. Vandana Shiva

Thursday July 21, 7:30 pm , local groups in Ojai, CA are gathering to support both the Soil Not Oil international campaign & the upcoming second annual Soil Not Oil Conference in August of this year with an evening gathering of film & discussion in Ojai, CA. Local filmmaker Camilla Becket will be in attendance sharing excerpts from her soon to be released film The Seeds of Vandana, with other short films on soils & carbon farming also a part of the evening.

In 2015 the first Soil Not Oil conference was held in Northern California with the intent of supporting the Soil Not Oil international campaign launched by brilliant Indian scientist, eco-activist, & author Vandana Shiva.  Vanda Shiva is a founding member of both Regenerative International and the Navadany Foundation, who were among the first to connect the dots between climate change and the disastrous soil practices of industrial agriculture.

Restoring global soil quality is one of the best things we can do for climate change.  Because our lives are entirely dependent on the health of our soils, the Soil Not Oil Campaign demands the care and regeneration of soils worldwide. Emphasizing extensive restructuring of land management practices, especially agriculture, is key to combating climate change with biologically healthy soils capable of sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, while also restoring water cycles, stopping ocean acidification, re-establishing biodiversity, improving food production, and revitalizing local economies across the planet.

The film & discussion event takes place on Thursday July 21, 2016, 7:30- 9pm, at the Farmer & the Cook Restaurant, 339 W El Roblar Dr, Ojai (Meiners Oak) CA 93023.   No reservations required. For more info  contact 805-962-2571,  Margie@sbpermaculture.org,http://www.facebook.com/events/1733416276947943/

Event Co-sponsors Becket Films, Farmer & the Cook Restaurant, Santa Barbara Permaculture Network, & the Center for Regenerative Agriculture, East End Eden Permaculture Farm


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biodiversity conference, harvard, april 30th

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Announcing the following conference at Harvard on April 30th:

THE POWER AND PROMISE OF BIODIVERSITY: VISIONS OF RESTORING SEA, LAND, AND CLIMATE
Geological Lecture Hall
24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

The conference promises to “present the concepts, history, and processes for the restoration of biodiversity” in hopes that increasing global biodiversity can sequester carbon and not only stop, but actually reverse climate change. Tickets are $30 and you can register now on eventbrite. More information here!


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carbon farming gives hope for the future

From wellnesswarior.org

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The concept of carbon farming is relatively simple. The industrial agricultural system we’ve developed over the last 60 years, while being incredibly productive, robs the soil of carbon and other nutrients. Carbon, in the form of soil organic matter, is the thing that gives soil life. Techniques like cover cropping (never leaving the fields bare), no-till farming (leaving the soil intact while preparing and planting), crop rotations and carbon banking in perennial plants, take carbon from the atmosphere and lock it up in the soil. Soil-1, climate change-0. And the benefits of soil carbon sequestration go beyond reducing GHGs. Using the term “regenerative farming” Debbie Barker and Michael Pollan explain in a recent Washington Post article:

Regenerative farming would also increase the fertility of the land, making it more productive and better able to absorb and hold water, a critical function especially in times of climate-related floods and droughts. Carbon-rich fields require less synthetic nitrogen fertilizer and generate more productive crops, cutting farmer expenses.

In fact, research shows that in some regions a combination of cover-cropping and crop rotation vastly outperforms conventional farming. So why isn’t everyone doing it?

One of the problems, as Eric Toensmeier explains in his upcoming book The Carbon Farming Solution (to be released in February) is that carbon farming is not a one-size-fits-all venture. Cover-cropping may work in the southeast where winters are shorter, but may not work in northern Minnesota, for example. For more farmers to take up these practices, they need the assurance that they will work for them economically, and this type of assurance will come through research. But, research dollars for agriculture in the U.S. are not exactly flowing to sustainable agriculture.

To read more, click HERE!


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the year that ended dangerously: the ETC’s ireverant, snarky, and spot-on end of year review

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The ETC’s Report also contains this fabulous comic.

Every year, our friends at the ETC (stands for Action Group on Erosion, Technology, and Concentration) puts out an, as they say, “irreverent,” year-end recap– and this year’s is out now! We’ve compiled a brief list of the highlights from the 2015 edition of the ETC’s yearly End of Year Review:

  • Comparing itself to the Grinch that Stole Christmas when complaining about the Paris attacks, the ETC explains how in the proceedings the Climate Activists “lost time and ground that we can’t recover.”
  • Turns out phytoplankton are carbon sequesters.
  • The Good and the Bad news coming out of the tech sphere (gene drives, AI, Ben and Jerry’s, Technology Bank…)
  • Whimsical historical anecdotes from the year (good moral boosters)
  • And this favorite quote: ““Let’s be clear about this, our company was dishonest. And in my German words, we have totally screwed up.”
  • A not-to-be-missed reading list!
  • Clairvoyant prophecies regarding 2016.

Read it here!


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good primer on reclaiming our soils and regenerative farming

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Excerpted from Ronnie Collins’s essay Regeneration: Global Transformation in Catastrophic Times:

We must begin to connect the dots between fossil fuels, global warming and related issues, including world hunger, poverty, unemployment, toxic food and farming, extractivism, land grabbing, biodiversity, ocean destruction, deforestation, resource wars, and deteriorating public health. As we regenerate the soil and forests, and make organic and grass-fed food and fiber the norm, rather than just the alternative, we will simultaneously develop our collective capacity to address all of the globe’s interrelated problems.

The extraordinary thing about de-industrializing food and farming, restoring grasslands and reversing deforestation—moving several hundred billion tons of carbon back from the atmosphere into our soils, plants and forests—is that this regeneration process will not only reverse global warming and re-stabilize the climate, but will also stimulate hundreds of millions of rural (and urban) jobs, while qualitatively increasing soil fertility, water retention, farm yields and food quality.

Read the full essay here!