the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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bbc’s business daily: what is up with global agriculture subsidies?

Sembrado_de_soja_en_argentina

Man! We’re always asking the same question! Seriously though, this is a great episode, both for those looking for a good primer on the subject and a fascinating case study for those who already know a lot about it. The podcast delves into the soya market in Argentina, global ag subsidies as a whole, and, as a bit of a non-sequador, on lab-grown meat for human consumption.


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the world’s most important fruit

Sitting in picture-perfect Peak District grounds, Chatsworth House seems an unlikely birthplace for today’s global banana industry. But practically every banana consumed in the western world is directly descended from a plant grown in the Derbyshire estate’s hothouse 180 years ago.

This is the story of how the Cavendish became the world’s most important fruit – and why it and bananas as we know them could soon cease to exist….


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the real world …. of 17th century farming

This is the true story… of seven strangers and farm animals… picked to live on a 17th century farm…working together with only the tools available in the year 1620 ….
Tune in to find out what happens… when people stop being polite… and start getting real…
Spoiler alert: everyone on this show is always polite if not totally charming!
Also, they are historians, archeologists, and experts in agrarian culture.
it is basically the best show ever.
There is 1 episode for each month, starting with September.


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listen! bbc interviews common ground, the arts and environment organization

Click HERE to listen to this radio program

For thirty years, the arts and environment organization Common Ground has used Dorset as a kind of laboratory for its work celebrating local distinctiveness, before rolling their projects out elsewhere around the UK. Helen Mark hears from Common Ground co-founder Sue Clifford why they began Apple Day events near her home in Shaftesbury, as a way of celebrating and protecting old apple orchards. Helen also meets the sculptor Peter Randall-Page who was commissioned to carve some small wayside sculptures along a footpath above Lulworth Cove, and the composer Karen Wimhurst reflects on Confluence, the three year music project she was involved in that celebrated the river Stour, from its source to the sea.