the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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listen: Severine talks seaweed on the BBC

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Photo Credit: Gordon Chibroski/Press Herald Staff Photographer

Severine spoke to BBC radio in the UK this about the need for an informed and sustainable approach to seaweed farming, one of the fastest growing aquaculture sectors anywhere right now. Listen to her talk about the culinary benefits of seaweed, and tell the story about how she got into seaweed herself on the coast of Maine by getting in literal touch with nature.

Listen to the full programme HERE


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cobia: it’s for dinner? (this is bogus)

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We are here to call out this bogus fish farming article from the April 2014 issue of National Geographic on a “pioneering” fish farmer in Panama. “The Other White Meat” follows Brian O’Hanlon, who’s working to make Cobia, a little-known species native to mid-atlantic and indo-pacific waters, a challenger to the dinner paradigm of salmon and sea bass. Why? They say it may be cheaper, more environmentally-friendly, and humane to produce.

“O’Hanlon’s farm, which is part of a company he founded called Open Blue, wants to buck 4,000 years of human innovation and farm fish back in the ocean. He says that raising an animal in its natural habitat means it will be healthier and taste better and, with the right technology, grow far more efficiently. Some have said he’s pioneering a new form of aquaculture. O’Hanlon is on his way to shipping 250 tons of fish each month, a respectable haul for a midsize company under ten years old. Every few days, planes take what once swam in his underwater cages off to Asia, Europe, and North America. He started the operation in Panama in 2009, and last year, for the first time, demand exceeded supply.”

Read more on the National Geographic website.


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solution to pollution (or overfishing), is it really aquaculture?

As scientists struggle to count fish, and conservationists attempt to save them, America’s oldest fishing community – Gloucester, Massachusetts is dying. Fishermen are losing their livelihood and even their homes. Last year, NOAA imposed a historic cut to the cod quota — a 78% catch reduction. Then, on Nov. 10, 2014 — the U.S. government closed the Gulf of Maine.

For centuries, cod fed the world and built our nation. But today, the iconic American fisherman is caught in a perfect storm of foreign competition, erratic regulations and declining fish stocks. FISH & MEN, an upcoming film, will reveal to consumers what they don’t know about where their fish comes from, who is catching it, and how it lands on their plate.

Cheap imported fish continues to flood U.S. markets. In fact, 91% of the seafood Americans eat is imported — and only 1% is inspected by the FDA. Even in coastal towns, fish fed to schoolchildren and consumed in most restaurants is imported from thousands of miles away, frozen and thawed. Meanwhile, the bounty of healthy fish that might be sustainably fished from the thousands of miles of pristine coastline of the United States is being suppressed. To read more and to watch the trailer, click HERE.