the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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amazing new energy source: introducing TREES

REimage
Scientists at the Climate/Energy Design and Research institute (CEDAR) have just announced the discovery of an astounding new energy source that promises to solve several of humanity’s thorniest dilemmas at once.

“This is a paradigm-shifting moment,” says Dawn O’Newday, the engineer in charge of the project. “Whatever your game is, this changes it. Big time.”

The new energy source, called TREES (Totally Renewable Energy, Emissions capture, and Storage) is, as the name suggests, completely renewable. Unlike conventional power plants, TREES devices use no fuel; and unlike most solar and wind technologies, TREES requires no non-renewable materials for the manufacture of panels or turbines.

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how’s your gut going?

We know that our microbiome (or the collective bacteria in and on the human body) has been shown to play important roles in our digestion, metabolism, and possibly even our sleep cycles. But recent research is revealing that it also might profoundly affect our psychological disposition. In a June article in the New York Times (feature below), Peter Andrey Smith writes about the new field of study in psychobiotics, or the bacteria in our gut that may very well be affecting our moods, dispositions, and even our disorders.

(And, for a good primer on the groundbreaking and utterly fascinating research being done in this area, we recommend Michael Pollan’s 2013 New York Times article, “Some of My Best Friends are Germs.”)

Can Bacteria in Your Gut Explain Your Mood?
by Peter Andrey Smith

Eighteen vials were rocking back and forth on a squeaky mechanical device the shape of a butcher scale, and Mark Lyte was beside himself with excitement. ‘‘We actually got some fresh yesterday — freshly frozen,’’ Lyte said to a lab technician. Each vial contained a tiny nugget of monkey feces Continue reading


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research highlight: removing non-crop habitat does not increase food safety

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Schematic of farm environment using co-management approach for food safety and environment.

In 2006, a deadly Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak in bagged spinach was traced to California’s Central Coast region, where >70% of the salad vegetables sold in the United States are produced. Although no definitive cause for the outbreak could be determined, wildlife was implicated as a disease vector. Growers were subsequently pressured to minimize the intrusion of wildlife onto their farm fields by removing surrounding non-crop vegetation. How vegetation removal actually affects foodborne pathogens was unknown. Researchers at UC Berkeley (including Daniel Karp and Claire Kremen of BFI‘s Center for Diversified Farming Systems), UC Davis, the Nature Conservancy, and the Natural Capital Project found that removal of non-crop vegetation did not in fact reduce incidences of enterohemorrhagic E. coli(EHEC). The study actually found a slight but significant increase in pathogen prevalence where non-crop vegetation had been removed, calling into question reforms that promote vegetation removal to improve food safety.

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drumroll…

MARCH 1978

down east

http://www.downeast.com/march-1978/ 

Features

Maine’s Surprising Legislature

Lawmakers in Augusta are getting younger and more independent. And more and more of them are women. By Bill Caldwell.

Bringing Her Down East

A greenhorn learns the ropes on the Gazela Primeiro. By W.B. Leavenworth.

Good News for the Countryside

A new breed of health practitioner is bringing improved medical care to rural Maine. By Lois Lowry.

Deserting the Rock

After 147 years, Mount Desert Rock Light Station is given over to the machines. By John P. March.

Long Season in Aroostook

Color photographic essay by Norm Gibbons.

Tea at Chimney Farm

A visit with Elizabeth Coatsworth at her Nobleboro farmstead. By Sabra Morton.


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northern NY research evaluates non-traditional crops for high tunnel growers

tunnel

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has funded a number of projects evaluating ways to extend the growing season and crop options for high tunnel farmers in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties; photo: Michael Davis, Willsboro Agricultural Research Farm.

Can cucumbers, basil, ginger, green beans and zucchini be more profitable crops for farmers than tomatoes, the king of high tunnel produce? The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has released the results of a project evaluating the economic potential of the non-traditional tunnel crops.

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solutions for self reliance

 

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Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 8.21.55 AMRESILIENCE

http://waldenlabs.com/about/


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soil is life

photographs by lawrence braun

photographs by lawrence braun

Herbivorous Solar Conversion and Sequestration in the Shenandoah Valley
By Joeal Salatin, Rural America, August 16th, 2015

Soil is a world. A community of beings as unbelievable as you can imagine. If you could go out right now and look at the soil through an electron microscope you’d see this kind of 4-legged-aqueous-cow creature walking along, splashing and eating cilia and paramecium and all this other stuff. Then, all of the sudden from 10 o’clock, in runs this narwhal 6-legged thing who pierces the four-legged cow-looking thing and, fthhhh, sucks out the juices. And then while this aqueous-cow-looking-4-legged critter is sitting there, desiccating—being sucked into the straw by this narwhal thing—in comes an 8-legged critter from 2 o’clock running into the electron microscope you’re looking into. He has scissors on the top of his head and whacks off the head of the cow-looking thing and, thp thp thp thp thp thp thp, eats it up. And all this happens in a fraction of a second in the electron microscope while you’re looking at it. This is what’s going on. It’s out there happening billions and billions of times a second. Everywhere we step, everywhere we are. And yet, who thought about this world in their shower this morning?

Want to learn how to rebuild soil with animals? Read the full article!

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