the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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does food tech hurt small farmers?

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Does Food Tech Help Farmers?,”was the central question of a Civil Eats article from last week. Reporter Dave Holt spoke to several small scale CSA and market farmers about their experience with the recent glut of internet startups– from Farmdingo to Good Eggs– asking mainly if e-commerce was good for business. Some farmers said yes, some said no. Most indicated that regardless of the relative benefits and costs of partnering with online distribution companies, doing so is becoming increasingly necessary. In the words of one farmer interviewed, “If you can’t beat them, join them.”

 

But the farmers say they were disappointed, when, after being Farmigo’s loyal customer for several years, the company (backed by $26 million in funding) “came into the market we’ve developed over the past 25 years and started competing with us.”

We’d love to hear what you think. Let us know in the comments section if you use or have used an e-commerce platform for marketing and how it worked for you!


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metro buses converted into mobile food markets for low income neighborhoods

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“Back in 2010, the city of Toronto (in Ontario, Canada) decided to launch a program that converts old unused metro buses into mobile grocery stores called Mobile Good Food Markets, and ever since, they’ve been traveling across the Toronto metropolitan area selling affordable fresh food. They have been especially successful (and helpful) in low income neighborhoods.”

Reblogged from The Black and Minority Business Blog. Read the whole post HERE!


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jane jacobs: citizen economist

Jane Jacobs

We tend to take it for granted that nature—being basic to everything—is the place to begin when we try to understand regional economies. The given natural attributes of a region certainly do explain much about subsistence economies: why some people eat seals and caribou while others eat dates and goats; why herders in some places stay put beside their fields while others traipse back and forth between summer and winter pastures; why some people shelter in thatch and mats while others build with stone and timber; why some spin wool, others cotton, and so on. But interesting as such economic travelogues are, they don’t go far to explain even subsistence economies. For one thing, they don’t explain why these are subsistence economies instead of something else.

To read more, click HERE!


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help this future foodways attorney win a 10k scholarship

 Emily Melvin

Emily Melvin has been selected as a finalist in the BARBRI Law Preview “ONE LAWYER CAN CHANGE THE WORLD” $10K scholarship opportunity.Only 20 future law students made it to the final round, and she was one of them. She wrote an essay about “How you hope to use your law degree to change our world and how $10,000 towards your 1L tuition would change your world.”

Please read her essay submission, cast a vote on her behalf every day until June 1, 2016, and consider posting to your social media pages.  Voting takes place at http://ow.ly/4naNE8

“I am a farmer. Or rather, I was a farmer. The rough calluses on my hands testify to the years I worked close to the earth coaxing vegetables from the soil to feed my local community. I adore the art of cultivation, the gratification after a soaking rain, and the satisfaction of a freshly harvested bunch of carrots. However, pressing issues facing agriculture compel me to lay aside my hoe and pick up the scholarly pursuit of a legal education.
Agriculture is in jeopardy in our country along with the safety and security of our food system. The evolution of the “get big or get out” mentality hindered farming as a viable occupation on a moderate scale and catalyzed a mass exodus from rural communities. Now, large centralized farms and food processing plants cause disease outbreaks to spread farther and wider than ever before.
Fortunately, I know we can fix these problems. With a $10,000 scholarship to pursue a law degree, I will be infinitely closer to my dream of working within the current system to improve regulations surrounding food, making it feasible for the small farmer to stay in business. In turn, this will stimulate economic opportunity in rural communities and encourage national food security. Moreover, I will seek to provide counsel on policies that encourage safe and transparent food practices. Equipped with a legal education and a deep practical understanding of farming, I intend to do everything in my power to ensure our food system truly nurtures the nation.”

 


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greenhorns releases: MANIFESTA!

We are so proud of this awesome collaboration. If you’ve been wondering how a maritime art stunt fits into the mission of an organization that supports farmers (I mean, talk about your landlubbers!), this publication is for you! Manifesta lays out the story, history, discourse, and activism behind the Maine Sail Freight project last summer! The un-monograph is a fun and galvanizing read, and we think it is going to make a real believer out of you!

This is a story about a group of young farmers staging a pageant-like protest about the terms of trade in our agricultural economy, and the nature of transportation and exchange within that model.

It’s an elaborate stunt, invoking colonial history and the maritime ex- traction economy of coastal Maine as a platform for discourse on a more regional, more prosperous, and more diverse food economy for the future.

We claim the ocean as an ally and a commons—a venue to imagine what a world where 60% of the retail price goes to the farmer, and view- point from which to watch the farmers of the region operate, and co-oper- ate to circulate wealth and add value. We raise a flag for food sovereignty on the mast of our sail boat.

We are not content to labor where 70% of the agricultural work is performed by those without citizenship. We are not content to operate
in a high-volume, low-value commodity extraction economy. We are not content to be silent while our nation negotiates yet more free trade agree- ments freeing only those at the top of the capitalist slag heap and chaining the rest of us to their terms.

This project is our retort!


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new farm floats into the big apple

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New York’s Newest Urban Farm Will Float Down The Hudson River

New York City’s newest urban farm will look a little different from most: instead of factory-like rows of plants growing in a warehouse, it will be a lush, natural-looking food forest that floats down the Hudson River in a barge.

As it docks at local piers this summer—stopping at each pier for at least two weeks—New Yorkers will be able to get on, wander around, and pick free food.

The farm-as-art-project, called Swale, is on the water for a few reasons. The first is practical. Food forests are a type of community garden that mimics a natural landscape, and that anyone can freely harvest. Though they exist in a few other places, such as Seattle, they’re illegal on land in New York City. But by putting Swale in the Hudson River, the artists who created it were able to sidestep that regulation.

Read the full article HERE!


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ugly fruit is especially nutritious

Eat Ugly Apples Picture

Source: Eliza Greenman (elizapples.com)

Greenhorns blogger Eliza Greenman is featured on NPR, the Weather Channel and Food&Wine this week in regards to her work on #eatuglyapples!

Food&Wine: Bruised and scabbed apples have more antioxidants and sugars because they’ve fought off natural stressors.

Grocery shoppers don’t generally make a beeline to the scabbed and blemished apples. But maybe they should. New research shows that trauma to the fruit—stresses from fighting heat, bugs, and fungus—forces apples to produce antioxidants such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, anthocyanins and carotenoids. And these compounds have all kinds of nutritional value.

to read more, click HERE!

 

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