the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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affordable sustainable ag education opportunity for north carolina folks

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Located at the very center of North Carolina’s local food and farming scene, the Sustainable Agriculture Program at Central Carolina Community College is a unique opportunity for sustainable agriculture education.

At CCCC’s sustainable agriculture program students have the opportunity for “Real Farming- Right Now”. The Pittsboro, NC based program has an on-campus, year-round certified organic farm that is an integral part of teaching and learning. Field and hoophouse production, pasture-based heritage breed chickens and a commitment to incorporating sustainable technologies (solar, biofuels, reduced tillage) make this established and accessible program the place to get started in organic farming.

Students have the opportunity to meet and network with a wide variety of sustainable farms, businesses and organizations while participating in focused, practical education and training. Whether you are exploring the possibilities of a career in sustainable farming or you are already farming and recognize the need for some targeted learning opportunities (soil science, marketing, business plans!) you are welcome at CCCC Sustainable Agriculture Program.

Interested students may apply online: http://www.cccc.edu/admissions/apply/

Fall 2016 registration for new students is open now; Fall classes will begin August 15th

Call Robin Kohanowich for more information about sustainable agriculture at CCCC. 919-545-8031rkoha065@cccc.edu Certificate and Degree programs available.

www.cccc.edu/agriculture/  Affordable, convenient, established


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permaculture design intensive, june 24-july 3, gaberville, CA

Edible Forest Garden Design Intensive
with Dave Jacke, author of Edible Forest Gardens
June 24 – July 3, 2016, at Heartwood Institute
Scholarships available. Apply early.

In this nine-day intensive course, you will dive deeply into the vision,
theory, and practice of designing wholesome, dynamic, and resilient edible
ecosystems. Dave Jacke and his teaching team will offer lectures, site walks,
experiential classes, and design exercises to help you understand how the
architecture, social structure, underground economics, and successional
processes of natural forests apply to the design of edible ecosystems of all
kinds.

You’ll learn a variety of ecological design processes while designing a range
of food-producing ecosystems for the Heartwood Institute.  You’ll provide
detailed polyculture designs for an actual food forest at Heartwood. We’ll
also engage with issues of garden management, economics, and the deep
paradigmatic shifts required to succeed at co-creating “HumaNatural”
landscapes and cultures. You will leave inspired and empowered to design food
forests at home for yourself and your friends, neighbors and clients.

Lead Instructor:
Dave Jacke is the lead author of the award winning two-volume book Edible
Forest Gardens. Dave has been a student of ecology and design since the 1970s,
and has run his own ecological design firm – Dynamics Ecological Design in
Greenfield, MA – since 1984. Dave is an engaging and passionate teacher of
ecological design and permaculture, and a meticulous designer. In addition to
extensive teaching, he has consulted on, designed, built, and planted
landscapes, homes, farms, and communities in the many parts of the United
States, as well as overseas. A cofounder of Land Trust at Gap Mountain in
Jaffrey, NH, he homesteaded there for a number of years. He holds a B.A. in
Environmental Studies from Simon’s Rock College (1980) and a M.A. in Landscape
Design from the Conway School of Landscape Design (1984).

Come learn & grow with us at Heartwood!

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
http://www.heartwoodinstitute.org/programsevents/forest-garden-design-intensive-course


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premature deaths on the rise in rural areas

Where you live should not determine how long you live. New research shows it does.

Americans have enjoyed increasingly longer lives over time. Advances in medicine, a decline in fatal car accidents, and falling violent crime rates mean we are living longer.

But new research shows a reversal of this trend for some. If you are rich, geography doesn’t matter. Your expected lifespan is still increasing. But if you are poor, geography matters. In parts of the country we see an actual reversal of the trend.

geography of life expectancy map

The trend is also correlated with increasingly fractious politics. The Washington Post found that the places where middle-aged whites are dying fastest are the same places where presidential candidate Donald Trump is performing best.

To read more of this article from the Center for Rural Affairs, click HERE!


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fork to fork

11th June sees the second year of the Franklin Fork to Fork Festival, a celebration of food, drink, music and the buzz of a strong, engaged and active community!   There will be food from Kitty Fisher’s, the River Café, etc etc etc…..

The aim is to raise funds for the Open Air Classroom project at Ark Franklin Primary Academy where we are building an inspirational garden space that will be open to both the school and the local community.  The aim of the garden is to provide an enriching, exciting and educational space for children to learn the fundamental elements of healthy nutrition alongside mathematics, English, science and the wider curriculum, bringing their learning to life.  A place where pupils and the wider community can experience the joy of discovery, solve problems, be creative, develop self-confidence and mature both socially and emotionally.

Our plans include a pond, raised beds, an outdoor kitchen, space for productions and a weather station, affording our children daily opportunities to physically engage with their environment.  We hope the garden can help reverse the trend that currently sees children in the UK spending less time in green spaces than the population of our prisons.  Our garden will give children access to the outdoors, reversing trends in obesity and childhood depression and giving our children space to reflect and grow.  To visit this website and watch the video, click here!


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farm and homestead day at mofga

Farm & Homestead Day at MOFGA
Get ready to get dirty!
Saturday, June 11, 2016
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., rain or shine
Bringing the days of old alive for today’s world, Farm & Homestead Day at MOFGA (Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association) is a 100 percent hands-on, FREE event where people of all ages come together to share and learn about resilient skills handy for the farm and homestead. It’s for anyone looking to live simply and close to the earth.
Here’s a peek at what you might find yourself participating in, with over 40 workshops scheduled:
  • Help construct a methane digester, get it started with waste from our F&H Day potluck, and come back in September to see its progress at the Common Ground Country Fair.
  • Explore permaculture in the orchard by sowing a variety of companion plants.
  • Forage for herbs and craft your own herbal salves.
  • Put together ingredients to take home your own sourdough starter.
  • Learn to sew a deerskin pouch or weave a basket.
  • Work together to design and erect the perfect garden scarecrow.
  • Slaughter, skin and butcher a rabbit, tan the hide, and we will cook the meat in our stone soup.
The focus at F&H Day at MOFGA is on simple technologies that use readily available items and can be learned with no previous experience.
Farm & Homestead Day takes place at MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center, 294 Crosby Brook Road in Unity. The event will begin at 9 a.m. with tea and crumpets (and at 7 a.m. for those who want to help scythe a berm), with skill-sharing workshops running from 9:30 to 4:30. No pre-registration is necessary.
Join together for a potluck picnic lunch at noon. Enjoy freshly baked bread and butter, made from flour ground and cream churned in the children-of-all-ages area, along with bean hole beans and scrumptious stone soup (with vegan, gluten-free and meat versions). Bring a dish from home to share – something that does not need to be heated or refrigerated.

There will be an ongoing Plant Swap, so please bring your extra seedlings or divided perennials to share. (Don’t forget to label your plants.) Participants are encouraged to take responsibility for their own trash and come prepared to “pack it in, pack it out.”

A schedule and list of workshops will be posted before the event at www. mofga.org  (click on Events > June > Farm & Homestead Day).

Volunteers are welcome and appreciated, with opportunities to help the day before, of and after the event. Volunteers also receive a free T-shirt! To volunteer, contact Anna Libby at alibby@mofga.org or 207-568-4142.

For more information, contact the Farm & Homestead Day Committee at  farmandhomesteadday@myfairpoint.net or 207-568-7597.

The Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA, www.mofga.org), formed in 1971, is the oldest and largest state organic organization in the country. The purpose of the Association is to help farmers and gardeners grow organic food, fiber and other crops; protect the environment; recycle natural resources; increase local food production; support rural communities; and illuminate for consumers the connection between healthful food and environmentally sound farming practices.

 

 


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beginning woman farmer mentorship opportunity in iowa

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The Women, Food and Agriculture Network is accepting applications for their Harvesting Our Potential program, an 8-10 week internship for women who are interested in farming/raising food or food products. The purpose of the program is to empower women who want to farm by providing them on-farm experience and a network of other women in food and agriculture. There is no cost to the intern, and they receive a small stipend of $500 if they complete the program and their evaluation forms (which are quite simple).  They work with a female farmer who has been farming for at least 5 years. The intern would fill out an application, which allows them to share the type of farming they are interested in, then they will be matched with the best mentor for their interests.  We have mentors across Iowa.

There are opportunities for the women to live on-farm or, if their mentor is close by, they can drive to the farm on their scheduled workdays.  They set up goals with their mentor, and then track those goals over the course of the time they are involved.

To apply to be a mentee, click HERE!
Find more on the Harvesting Our Potential program and WFAN by clicking HERE.
Thanks to Anna Johnson for sharing this info with us!


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jane jacobs: citizen economist

Jane Jacobs

We tend to take it for granted that nature—being basic to everything—is the place to begin when we try to understand regional economies. The given natural attributes of a region certainly do explain much about subsistence economies: why some people eat seals and caribou while others eat dates and goats; why herders in some places stay put beside their fields while others traipse back and forth between summer and winter pastures; why some people shelter in thatch and mats while others build with stone and timber; why some spin wool, others cotton, and so on. But interesting as such economic travelogues are, they don’t go far to explain even subsistence economies. For one thing, they don’t explain why these are subsistence economies instead of something else.

To read more, click HERE!

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