the irresistible fleet of bicycles

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sassafras stomp tour dates!


Remember Adam and Johanna, the sweet song birds of Songbird Farm in Unity, ME? Good. Just to keep you abreast of their happenings: you can catch Adam’s interview on the Greenhorns Radio here, order his CD here, and see him and Johanna live at the following shows!

Fri. Oct 21st.  Contradance in Brooklyn, NY
Sat.  Oct. 22nd.  CDNY Contradance.  Manhattan, NY.
Sun. Oct 23rd.  House Concert, Brooklyn, NY (email for more info)
The songbirds also report: “We’re heading out on a longer tour in late November, with shows in Kentucky, Indiana, Colorado, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and Montana.  More of these dates are contradances, though we’re hoping to add a number of concerts to the tour to promote the songs and stories on Walk These Fields.  For more information see: and to book them: song.bird

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seven super do-able steps towards maintaining your creative life as a parent


Artists and farmers alike, we know it ain’t easy to maintain your art when you’ve got buns in and out of the oven. In fact, I’d say that between the sleepless nights of those early years to the struggle of raising kids on what are not famously-lucrative salaries, raising the next generation of beautiful, free-spirited, progressives is more like a downright herculean task. (Gosh, creative and farming parents, we just appreciate all the work you do!)

Luckily, there are some really smart people out there puzzling over the current societal barriers to maintaining one’s art while raising a family and choosing to have children while pursuing one’s art. Today’s case in point: the Temporary Art Review published this piece on parenting in the creative community. It’s short, makes a lot of practical sense, and is relevant not just for creative parents– but for those in their community interested in supporting them!

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Agrarian Trust Symposium speaker Kim Stringfellow’s cool ass project!

The Mojave Project is really just kind of the bomb-diggety. But don’t take our word for it: to learn more, we recommend this absolutely gorgeous video. The project is an “experimental transmedia documentary led by Kim Stringfellow exploring the physical, geological and cultural landscape of the Mojave Desert.” Browse the current projects here.

And while we’re talking about the Mojave Project, they’re asking you to
WHAT: We pleased to send you this SAVE THE DATE announcement about our autumn program OUR LAND 2: Tracing the Acequia Commons, a series of talks, exhibits and happenings to advance the broadening discourse on land commons and farmland futures.

WHERE: New Mexico! Most events Free and open to the public.

WHEN: November 9-17th in close association with the Quivira Coalition and Biodynamic Association annual conferences, Agrarian Trust invites you to join us in fine company  to approach topics of Public Trust, Acequia traditions and commons culture, emergent urban commons, water enclosures and new topographics; through lectures, documentary films, open archive exhibits and an walk along an Acequia irrigation ditch, flowing continuously for four centuries.

WHO: Mary Wood, Rick Prelinger, Kim Stringfellow, Tezozomoc, Devon Pena, Ruth Breach, Stanley Crawford, Wes Jackson, Emily Vogler, Ildi Carlisle-Cummins, Eric Holt Gimenez, Kate Levy… and more


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This April, as the communal irrigation ditches known as acequias run with spring melt and farmers carve new furrows into their fields, many northern New Mexico villages will celebrate their annual homecoming. This is the time of the limpia –– the cleaning of the acequia, when water-rights holders and their families gather to haul rocks, dig mud and clear brush, honoring a tradition so old that its followers can only guess at its roots. In some villages, the tradition has died out as young people move to cities in search of employment and the elderly pass on. But in El Cerrito, a small agrarian community on the Pecos River 60 miles southeast of Santa Fe, more people come home to attend the limpia every year.

El Cerrito has been photographer Sharon Stewart’s creative ground for two decades. Now based in Chacon, N.M., Stewart grew up among canals and pump houses in southern Texas. Her great-grandfather was a photographer, and her father a water district attorney. She earned a degree in economics at the University of Texas, and after an uninspired fling with business school, helped found the Houston Center for Photography. Her work has been featured in galleries across the United States and in Europe. To read more about the Acequia tradition in the high country news, click here!

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“this soil is fertile.”

Artists from South Sudan, a new country fraught with internal conflict, make a case for the power of community agriculture in their music video. As they sing, rap, and comb through fields of corn, okra, and sorghum, their message is clear: There’s rich soil in Sudan, and it will improve the lives of people if they decide to use it–but it’s up to them to start digging.

Check out the behind-the-scenes interviews, too, for words from The Jay Family about why they feel farming can help the people of Sudan. Yuppie Jay says, “People blame the governor when something goes wrong. But at our homes we need to put things right. We need to go, to present to the government that we have made this, we have crops, we have farms. Then the government can support with money for roads, for tractors. But we can’t wait for the government to fix all our problems. We need to arrange ourselves and be where we are.”

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hawaii to ny in a double hulled sailing canoe

Hōkūleʻa, our Star of Gladness, began as a dream of reviving the legacy of exploration, courage, and ingenuity that brought the first Polynesians to the archipelago of Hawaiʻi. The canoes that brought the first Hawaiians to their island home had disappeared from earth. Cultural extinction felt dangerously close to many Hawaiians when artist Herb Kane dreamed of rebuilding a double-hulled sailing canoe similar to the ones that his ancestors sailed. Though more than 600 years had passed since the last of these canoes had been seen, this dream brought together people of diverse backgrounds and professions. Since she was first built and launched in the 1970s, Hōkūle’a continues to bring people together from all walks of life. She is more than a voyaging canoe—she represents the common desire shared by the people of Hawaii, the Pacific, and the World to protect our most cherished values and places from disappearing.

To learn more, click HERE!