the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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think you know what a farmer looks like?

Preliminary results from the 2012 Census of Agriculture show the increasing role of women in U.S. agriculture—especially on organic and small-scale farms.
Lindsay Morris Carpenter
When Lindsey Morris Carpenter was a college student studying art in Philadelphia, she never expected that, just a decade later, she would spend most of her days fixing up tractors, turning piles of manure, and corralling chickens.
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Today, Carpenter’s certified-organic operation, Grassroots Farm, grows fruit, vegetables, hops, and herbs; she also sells pesticide-free cut flowers and eggs from the farm’s chickens. Being as environmentally sustainable as possible is paramount to Grassroots’ operations, Carpenter says. So, too, is a commitment to provide healthy, fresh food to local people regardless of the size of their bank accounts.

“One of my biggest priorities is affordability,” Carpenter said. She doesn’t want to be the Whole Foods of farm-to-table produce. To that end, she designed her community supported agriculture program to be relatively affordable. She charges only $25 a week for a box of produce, which she offers 16 weeks out of the year.

Carpenter is one of America’s new and growing class of women farmers. Her focus on sustainability and social justice represent part of the promise women bring to the sector, while the difficulties she faces demonstrate some of the challenges that stand in their way. —-> Click to read more! 

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casting call for city women turning towards the farming life

Orion Entertainment
Cole Huling, a casting producer for Orion Entertainment, is currently working on a new TV series that features women who are leaving behind the city/suburban life to become farmers/ranchers/etc., working the land and raising animals. They are looking for women who have recently moved to a farm as well as women who are preparing to move.
 Women with a sense of adventure, lots of energy, and a great story to tell are encouraged to get in contact!
Contact details:
Cole Huling
Casting Producer 
Orion Entertainment


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beginning women farmer training

The Central New York Resource Conservation and Development Project is accepting applications for a year long, statewide training program for beginning women farmers. Women farmers – and aspiring farmers – from around New York State are encouraged to signup for the course that promotes goal setting; financial, business, and marketing plans; land and infrastructure planning; soil fertility, and planned grazing. Continue reading


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farm mom

Nominate Your WFAN “Sustainable Farming Mom of the Year” by May 7!

Have you seen the hoopla lately from Monsanto about nominating candidates for their “Farmer Mom of the Year?” They’re giving away $5,000 to five lucky winners. Interestingly, nominees aren’t eligible unless they raise a certain number of acres of commodity crops or livestock. Anybody notice which farmers that leaves out?

In response, WFAN is offering a chance for you to nominate candidates for “Sustainable Farming Mom of the Year,” to honor the mothers in your life, biological or spiritual, who have set examples or guided you along your path to supporting sustainable, healthy food systems.

Send your nomination to us by emailing a description of why you think your nominee should be recognized for Mother’s Day (May 9). WFAN will choose one nominee to feature in a summer WFAN News profile, but ALL nominees will be featured on our website starting on Mother’s Day.

Don’t forget to send photos if you can! Email nominations to us by Friday, May 7.

On a related note, check out April Davila’s blog, “Nonsanto,” about her experiences trying to live without Monsanto for a month.


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good to keep these struggles in mind

Love v. Vilsack could be settled by legislation
Back in 2000 Rosemary Love of Harlem, Montana brought a discrimination lawsuit with other women farmers alleging

they were denied loans by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) because they are women. The suit is known as Love v. Vilsack, and if this suit sounds familiar it is because African American farmers, Native American farmers, and Hispanic farmers have brought similar discrimination lawsuits against the USDA.

Now, as Jerry Hagstrom reports for Agweek online, House Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee Chair Rosa DeLauro (CT) has introduced legislation that “finally could bring settlement of a discrimination lawsuit” filed by Love and the other women farmers. Continue reading

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