the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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young farmers in the news

“Greenhorns”: California couple learns farm life running local CSA farm
By Polly Keary, Editor

Andrew Ide, 27, has a degree in philosophy and theology. His wife Micha, 29, has a degree in anthropology and part of another in interior design. Both have experience in the California corporate world.

None of that knowledge is doing them any good now.

The chickens are out.

Read the rest of the article here.


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not farmland without farmers

Keep Farmland for Farmers
By LINDSEY LUSHER SHUTE and BENJAMIN SHUTE

CLERMONT, N.Y. — WHEN we went looking in upstate New York for a home for our farm, we feared competition from deep-pocketed developers, a new subdivision or a big-box store. These turned out to be the least of our problems.

Though the farms best suited for our vegetables were protected from development by conservation easements, we discovered that we couldn’t compete, because conserved farmland is open to all buyers — millionaires included.

Easements are intended to protect farmland, water, animal habitat, historic sites and scenic views, and so they are successful in keeping farms from becoming malls and subdivisions. But they don’t stop Wall Street bankers from turning them into private getaways, with price tags to match.

Read the rest here.


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we applaud the leadership of quivira

The Staff and the Board of the Quivira Coalition are very pleased to announce a major leadership transition. On November 1, 2012, the Board formally appointed Avery C. Anderson as Quivira’s new Executive Director! Courtney will assume the title of Founder and Creative Director and will focus on fundraising, writing and outreach activities. This transition is heartily supported by everyone at the organization and honors both Avery’s leadership skills and the need to think about long-range planning to keep Quivira resilient. We’re excited about this transition and look forward to the Next Steps it represents.


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ny times talks with young farmers

After Graduating From College, It’s Time to Plow, Plant and Harvest

RED HOOK, N.Y. — It was harvest time, and several farm hands were hunched over a bed of sweet potatoes under the midday sun, elbow deep in soil for $10 an hour. But they were not typical laborers.

Jeff Arnold, 28, who has learned how to expertly maneuver a tractor, graduated from Colorado State University. Abe Bobman, 24, who studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, was clearing vines alongside Nate Krauss-Malett, 25, who went to Skidmore College.

Mr. Krauss-Malett said he became interested in farming after working in a restaurant and seeing how much food was wasted. Mr. Bobman had the same realization working in the produce section at a grocery store before college.

They had been in the fields here at Hearty Roots Community Farm in the Hudson Valley since 7 a.m. They all said they could not imagine doing any other job.

Read the rest of the article here.


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lots of young farmers working with drafts

New Family Farm, bridge to a simpler past
By ANDREA GRANAHAN / West County Correspondent

The young farmers at New Family Farm were not born to their trade. They chose it with a great deal of thought in a way that is reminiscent of the Back to the Land movement of the 1970s. But in many ways these folks are not your Mama’s hippies.

Ryan Power, 26, his fiance Felicja Channing, 26, their 22-month-old baby, Aniela, and partner Adam Davidoff, 25, support themselves on 15 acres they lease outside of Sebastopol. With hired hand Jenny Hertzog, they grow certified organic vegetables on three and a half acres. The rest are devoted to animals, including the draft horses that pull their plows and the wildlife that travels on the fenced off corridor along the creek below their fields. Continue reading

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