the irresistible fleet of bicycles


Leave a comment

rice growing regions in china are more cooperative, interdependent

This story is part of National Geographic‘s special eight-month Future of Food series.

Rice and wheat do more than feed the world. They have also affected the way we think—in dramatically different ways.

That is the result of a study published Thursday in Science comparing people from different parts of China. Researchers led by Thomas Talhelm of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, found that people from rice-growing regions think in more interdependent and holistic ways than do those from wheat-growing areas.

Talhelm thinks these differences arose because it takes much more cooperation and overall effort to grow rice than wheat. To successfully plant and harvest rice, farmers must work together to build complex irrigation systems and set up labor exchanges. Over time, this need for teamwork fosters an interdependent and collectivist psychology. To read more, click HERE!


Leave a comment

eating insects for dinner could save the world

 

Rachael Young has been getting a lot of attention for her culinary explorations. But the founder of the pro-entomophagy organization Eat Yummy Bugs is, more than anything, a conservationist. “It informs everything I do,” she says.

Much of what Young does these days is spread the word that not only are insects delicious, but eating them on a large scale could have huge health and environmental benefits and open up profitable, sustainable avenues of commercial agriculture. The first step, she says, is to get past the cultural stigma attached to eating insects — a task for which she is well prepared.

Young, 33, knows that the revolution of insect eating will never arrive unless bugs can be prepared in tasty, non-icky ways. Which is why she teamed up with chef Mark Olofson and the adventurous spirits at Burlington’s ArtsRiot to host a “bug dinner”: a showcase of just how tasty bugs can be.

To read more about Rachael and her societal bug eating challenge, check out Ethan De Seife’s article in Sevendaysvt.com


Leave a comment

A training facility for low-input and small scale dairy in new england

*they’re also hiring!

wolfes-neck-farm-coast-maine-940x280

Wolfe’s Neck Farm Secures Major Grant from Stonyfield to launch an Organic Dairy Farmer Training and Research Program

FREEPORT, Maine — For many years, the story of dairy farming in New England was a story of decline. But, a new program being launched by Wolfe’s Neck Farm in partnership with organic yogurt maker, Stonyfield, hopes to change that trend. The Organic Dairy Farmer Training Program aims to revitalize and strengthen the organic dairy industry in Maine and New England while ushering in the next generation of organic dairy farmers. The program is made possible by a 3-year, $1,693,000 grant awarded to Wolfe’s Neck Farm from Stonyfield and the Danone Ecosystem Fund. Continue reading


Leave a comment

australians adapt the “seed circus” model

Find our seed circus model here. And check out what these guys are doing! 

1932267030_b953d1d1ec

Milkwood is a crew of doers and makers, dedicated to skills for smart, simple, regenerative living.

We’re a social enterprise based south of Sydney, Australia.

We thrive on sharing practical skills and knowledge that can help individuals and communities move towards a mode of living that’s ethical, abundant, and deeply hands-on.

At the moment we do this in two ways: with short courses held in both in Sydney and nearby farms, and with free online how-tos and resources.

We work with the best teachers we can find. People who are not only walking the talk, but are also skilled, humble and awesome communicators, who can empower folks to make the most of their new knowledge.


Leave a comment

report from the field

Greenhorn Erin Bullock says The Good Life Farm is “the coolest farm I’ve seen in a while.” And reports, “these kids are doing permaculture and agroforestry on a farm scale, they are smart cornell types, with cover crop tattoos for their wedding rings. They are building a huge new cidery for their apples, and a certified kitchen.  They run the farm off horse power, and grow baby ginger & turmeric in hoop houses, peaches, turkeys, asparagus, and now they are experimenting with grazing their angus in the woods.” 


IMG_3692

  Follow their BLOG for some inspiration!

IMG_3679

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 616 other followers