the irresistible fleet of bicycles


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apply to the community seed resource program!

The Community Seed Resource Program (CSRP) provides tools and guidance to community groups interested in creating seed-focused events, exchanges, libraries and gardens. It is a collaboration between Seed Matters and Seed Savers Exchange to support community seed initiatives and empower community organizing around sustainable seed.

The CSRP offers three resources to empower community organizing around sustainable seed:

-community seed toolkits, including seeds, educational resources, and seed saving supplies.
  -access to SSE’s national seed exchange
-mentorship

The CSRP focuses on legitimizing three key initiatives of community seed – seed swaps, community seed banks, and seed gardens – so community groups can weave seed into their efforts with success.

Community seed projects revive a tradition we’ve shared in growing food for centuries: from a handful of seed, we grow, gather, and share more seeds – enough not only for ourselves but an abundance to pass on to neighbors, family, and the next generation of gardeners and farmers. Saving and exchanging seeds is the way we discover new varieties, preserve heirlooms, and breed locally adapted varieties.

Whether you are a beginner seed saver or long-time organizer of seed projects, our resources can guide you through the decisions it takes to develop projects that fit the needs of your community. Click HERE to learn more and apply!


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shaka movement

You want to check this out. Shaka Movement.org
A model for addressing the GMO issue.

shaka

The SHAKA Movement is an advocacy, communications and educational outreach program and hub, where people and organizations come together to work in unison toward sustainable practices to affect a positive change for the environment and for the people of the Hawaiian Islands.

We are a self-organizing grassroots movement, which means that each of US who participates, IS the movement.

The goal of this website is to educate and organize citizens. We provide the best information available and give all citizens the opportunity to participate in affecting change in a way that best suits their life, their passion and their time availability. Continue reading


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rice growing regions in china are more cooperative, interdependent

This story is part of National Geographic‘s special eight-month Future of Food series.

Rice and wheat do more than feed the world. They have also affected the way we think—in dramatically different ways.

That is the result of a study published Thursday in Science comparing people from different parts of China. Researchers led by Thomas Talhelm of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, found that people from rice-growing regions think in more interdependent and holistic ways than do those from wheat-growing areas.

Talhelm thinks these differences arose because it takes much more cooperation and overall effort to grow rice than wheat. To successfully plant and harvest rice, farmers must work together to build complex irrigation systems and set up labor exchanges. Over time, this need for teamwork fosters an interdependent and collectivist psychology. To read more, click HERE!


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eating insects for dinner could save the world

 

Rachael Young has been getting a lot of attention for her culinary explorations. But the founder of the pro-entomophagy organization Eat Yummy Bugs is, more than anything, a conservationist. “It informs everything I do,” she says.

Much of what Young does these days is spread the word that not only are insects delicious, but eating them on a large scale could have huge health and environmental benefits and open up profitable, sustainable avenues of commercial agriculture. The first step, she says, is to get past the cultural stigma attached to eating insects — a task for which she is well prepared.

Young, 33, knows that the revolution of insect eating will never arrive unless bugs can be prepared in tasty, non-icky ways. Which is why she teamed up with chef Mark Olofson and the adventurous spirits at Burlington’s ArtsRiot to host a “bug dinner”: a showcase of just how tasty bugs can be.

To read more about Rachael and her societal bug eating challenge, check out Ethan De Seife’s article in Sevendaysvt.com


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A training facility for low-input and small scale dairy in new england

*they’re also hiring!

wolfes-neck-farm-coast-maine-940x280

Wolfe’s Neck Farm Secures Major Grant from Stonyfield to launch an Organic Dairy Farmer Training and Research Program

FREEPORT, Maine — For many years, the story of dairy farming in New England was a story of decline. But, a new program being launched by Wolfe’s Neck Farm in partnership with organic yogurt maker, Stonyfield, hopes to change that trend. The Organic Dairy Farmer Training Program aims to revitalize and strengthen the organic dairy industry in Maine and New England while ushering in the next generation of organic dairy farmers. The program is made possible by a 3-year, $1,693,000 grant awarded to Wolfe’s Neck Farm from Stonyfield and the Danone Ecosystem Fund. Continue reading

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